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Full text of "Pilgrim"

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Plymouth High School 






THE PILGRIM 



Volume XIX Plymouth, Mass., June, 1940 No. 1 

Published by the Plymouth Senior High School 

1939 The Pilgrim Staff 1940 



Editor-in-chief Dorris Bliss 

Asst. Editor-in-chief Walter Corrow 

Literary Editor ____-.___ Lewis Morton 

Junior Literary Editor __________ Dorothy Morton 

Sophomore Literary Editor Lydia Mongan 

Business Manager Alphonse Gambini 

Asst. Business Manager ---- Joseph Lamborghini 

Boys' Athletics Alton Zaniboni 

Girls' Athletics ---- Virginia Sampson 

Art Editor Edgar Mongan 

Asst. Art Editor -- Mary Creati 

Exchange Editor Milton Penn 

Asst. Exchange Editor ----- Frances Ryan 

French Editor - John Brewer 

Latin Editor Robert Briggs 

Alumni Editor Lydia Brewster 

Asst. Alumni Editor Jeanette Franks 

Joke Editor Howard Beever 

Asst. Joke Editor Roger Whiting 

School News Editor Helen Hamilton 

Asst. School News Editor Faith Millman 

_, . __ { Barbara Harlow 

Senior Features j L ois Chandler 

Senior Poems Margaret Roncarati 

Candid Camera Editor Caroline Russell 

Asst. Candid Camera Editor Sybil Feinberg 

Clubs _______ Lillian Hall 

Asst. Clubs - - Betty Whiting 

Typist Audrey Maloon 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 



COMMENCEMENT page 

Biographies In Silhouette ____________ 5 

Class Prophecy _------________ g 

The Sandpiper — a photostatic copy of a page from a Plymouth newspaper 
published in 1868, which provided the idea for a new kind of Class Will 8 

Class Will - - - 9 

Class Pictures n_22 

The Principal Speaks --------------22 

Our Heritage ---------------- 22 

To Know Thyself --------------- 23 

Class History Made Easy ------ __27 

In Tribute ---------------- 27 

Screen Review of 1940 ------------- 27 

Class Poem ----------- 28 

LITERATURE 

Chang ------------------ 29 

The Thin Man ----- -29 

If I Were King -------- - 30 

Youth and the Future -------------- 30 

A True Sportsman - - -31 

Active or Passive? -------------- 31 

In the Crow's Nest ------- - 32 

Sore Spots in American Life - --------33 

Old Ironsides ----------------34 

World's Fair Pete --------------- 36 

Doubles ---------- 37 

On the Trail of the Lost Acushnet - ---------- 37 

Go Right on Working ---- ----------38 

What's Your Score ___..--------- 38 

Junior Poetry Page - ---------- 39 

The Story Behind it -------------- 40 

Nosiree, Boys ----------------40 

Two Poems - -------- 41 

Sophomore Poetry Page --- ----43 

What Glory - - - - - - 62 

ACTIVITIES 

Day In— Day Out --------------- 51 

Club News ----------------53 

Sports ----------- - - 64 

CANDID CAMERA -------- - - 35 

SOPHOMORE CELEBRITIES ------------- 42 

CANDID CAMERA - - - -------- 44 

ALUMNI NOTES ------- 47 

GAME OF LIFE - - - - 63 

CYCLES OF ERROR .----.- - 71 



TO 



Mr. Edgar J. Mongan 





WITH DEEP APPRECIA- 
TION OF HIS SEVENTEEN 
YEARS OF SERVICE AS A 
TEACHER AND ASSISTANT 
PRINCIPAL IN THE PLYM- 
OUTH SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, 
AND IN RECOGNITION OF 
THE COMPLETION OF HIS 
FIRST YEAR AS PRINCIPAL, 
THIS BOOK IS DEDICATED. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/pilgrim1940plym 



THE PILGRIM 



Biographies In Silhoeette 

President of the Class of 1940 . . . has dark hair and dark 
eyes and five feet, ten inches of height to add forcefulness and 
impressiveness to his thundering oratory . . . desires, as we 
might imagine^ to be another Daniel Webster . . . has pet aver- 
sion for people who don't speak loudly enough at assembles to 
be heard all over the hall . . . enjoys walking because it is good 
exercise . . . born in Plymouth on January 31, 1923 . . . serves 
on the S. A. S. . . . owns most novel of pets, a calf . . . feels 
that his greatest accomplishment has been in the oratorical field; 
specifically, his 1939 Lincoln Day Speech, "He Could Take It" . . . 
owes his success to the generous hand of good fortune. 




Harold Scheid 




Robert Briggs 



Vice-President . . . five feet, eight inches of energy . . . 
constantly in action . . . has blue eyes that radiate fun and sin- 
cere friendship for all, and straight blonde hair that his public 
never sees mussed . . . called "Robby" by his especial friends 
. . . sometimes, "Maisie" because his middle name is Mason . . . 
has great desire to beat the "Baron" ... is going to Harvard 
. . . reveals fondness for baked bananas . . . states with con- 
viction that he abhors eggs in any shape or form . . . admits, 
fearing an inconsistency, he does like them in cake . . . enjoys 
tennis . . . born in Plymouth, October 2, 1923 ... is a member 
of the "Beach Wagon Drivers' Organization" . . . was vice- 
president of the S. A. S. when a Junior . . . served on the Honor 
Society, Honor Group, and Pilgrim Staff . . . admires Abraham 
Lincoln most of all famous men . . . says he owes his success 
to study. 



Efficient Secretary of our class . . . five feet, three inches 
tall . . . has brown hair worn in page-boy fashion and brown 
eyes . . . answers to the name of "Babe" . . . staunchly dis- 
approves, and says this is her pet peeve . . . can't resist pickles 
. . . states however, that she likes any kind of food that is placed 
before her . . . devotes time to tennis and basketball but main- 
tains she is no good at either ... be it the Old Professer himself, 
or Harry Babbitt's charms, thinks Kay Kyser's Orchestra is super- 
super . . . spends spare time knitting . . . served as captain of 
the hockey team in her Senior year . . . Secretary of the Honor 
Society . . . member of the S. A. S., Pilgrim Staff, and Honor 
Group . . . born in this Pilgrim town on February 1, 1922. 




Barbara Harlow 




Stanley Cook 



Guardian of our class treasury ... is five feet, seven and 
one-half inches tall . . . has greenish brown eyes that betray the 
tease that he is, and light brown hair . . . sadly needs the aid of 
bobby pins to keep it out of his eyes . . . nicknamed "Cookie" 
... is called "Bunny" occasionally because of his unforgettable 
role in "The Mad Hatters" ... is, possibly, humoring Mrs. Ray- 
mond when he says that fresh green peas are his favorite gas- 
tronomic delight . . . enjoys camping trips . . . says the finest 
sport is ice hockey because it's fast . . . admits his pet peeve is 
quarreling with Lois Chandler . . . likes the color green, for no 
particular reason . . . was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, 
November 19, 1922 . . . was on S. A. S. in his Sophomore and 
Junior years ... is in his glory when behind the wheel of the 
family Chrysler . . . also has a passion for beach wagons . . . 
any kind but Fords. 



THE PILGRIM 



Class Prophecy 

Those who read need shed no tears: 
We know full well we are no seers. 



The following article appeared in the 
"New York Times," on July 7, 1952: 

Well-known novelist plans tour of the 
United States. She is gathering ma- 
terial for a most unusual book, in 
which she will use many old acquain- 
tances as characters. She . . . 

The article continues, but let us 
change the scene. Two girls occupy a 
luxurious New York apartment. One is 
walking excitedly up and down; the 
other is sitting languidly in a comfort- 
able chair. 

"I'm sure I don't know where she 
could be!" I exclaimed, mentally wring- 
ing my hands. 

"You always told me that Miss Chand- 
ler was such an efficient secretary, 
Gloria," was Agnes Barlow's only com- 
ment. 

"She is," I answered hotly. "Some- 
thing weird must have happened to 
detain her!" 

"She has been gone four weeks now. 
The assignment you gave her must have 
proved difficult," Aggie smugly replied, 
knocking my words down my throat un- 
til I practically choked. 

"Possibly. I received one letter from 
her from Chicago last week. In it she 
said that she is bringing Margaret 
DeCost, famous dress designer, with her. 
Margaret has just returned from Europe. 
I expected them yesterday." 

A door slammed in the rear of the 
apartment, and Lois Chandler, Mar- 
garet DeCost, and a small, dark-haired 
girl entered the room. They were fol- 
lowed by our two favorite bell-hops, 
Louis Montali and Thomas Pimental, 
who were barely visible under an enor- 
mous pile of luggage. 

"I have your list of people. It took 
four long and tedious weeks to get it, 
and I even had to hire another secretary 
to help me. I brought her back with me 
so that you could either pay her the 
salary that is due her, or, perhaps, keep 
her." Miss Chandler paused, breathless. 

"But you are my secretary. I don't 
need another one!" I rebelled. 

"You needn't worry about that! She 
can be mine. Meet Miss Pozzi. Her first 
name is Tina." 

I greeted Miss Pozzi and readily 
assented to Miss Chandler's idea. An- 
other secretary would be of assistance 



on my trip, although I rather resented 
the idea of hiring a secretary for my 
secretary. Still the inference was that 
I was a person of some importance — and 
this was nattering, if costly. 

"Let's shuffle along," Agnes called 
from an adjoining room. "I have every- 
thing ready." 

"But how are we going?" questioned 
Miss Chandler. 

The room was so silent we could hear 
our brains knocking. We contemplated 
— but, before we could all reach the 
same conclusion, we heard a frightening 
roar above our heads, and a gray streak 
whizzed past the terrace, circled, and 
landed on sixteen wheels! It resembled 
an extremely large bullet. Like an 
answer to a prayer, Audrey Maloon, 
world famous aviatrix, stepped non- 
chalantly from the machine. 

I was a little dubious about the huge, 
gray bullet, but, as the others were en- 
thusiastic, I had as little choice as a bone 
at a dog fight. We went over and 
examined our conveyance. It really was 
a plane! Collecting our bags, we 
climbed aboard. Our conscientious 
Margaret turned to the gaping bell-hops 
and tipped them. "That's for service 
de luxe," she said like a condescending 
pat on the head. By this time the mana- 
ger of the hotel, George Moskos, had ap- 
peared to bid us carbolic acid, which is 
good-bye in any language, and we were 
off! 

I turned to wave goodbye to my dear 
friend, Miss Liberty, but she was no- 
where to be seen. Before we were quite 
certain that we had left New York, we 
had landed in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
I marveled at the accomplishment of the 
plane — and of Audrey Maloon. 

At the airport, pilots Charles Nicker- 
son and Bradford Smith came running 
over, followed by mechanic William Ide. 
They eagerly inspected the plane. Brad- 
ford, still nuts about planes, begged like 
a worm to be allowed to try the new 
model, but Audrey showed no more 
sympathy than a robin. Will Ide, mean- 
while, with a hammer in his hand, pro- 
ceeded alternately to tap and pound 
the plane to determine how soundly it 
was constructed. Subconsciously, I 
compared his maneuvers to those of a 
doctor giving a physical examination. 



THE PILGRIM 



If there weren't something organically 
wrong by the time he finished, it 
wouldn't be his fault. After Audrey 
clouded up and rained her refusal on 
them, they walked dejectedly away. 

We were greeted by air stewardess, 
Peggy Roncarati, who took us to one of 
the adjacent restaurants, which, we dis- 
covered, was owned by Alfonse Gam- 
bini. He had become used to having his 
money yell, not whisper, Peggy in- 
formed us. Due to the great success of 
his business ventures, he owned a chain 
throughout the country. 

We decided to visit the steel mills first, 
for we had learned that they were 
owned by a shrewd quartet who pos- 
sessed hearts of stainless steel — Warren 
Borgatti, Frank Ingenito, Umberto 
Stanghellini, and Warren Garuti. The 
tour was unexciting, but as interesting 
as any expedition which requires the 
inspection of large quantities of machin- 
ery could be, and the workers appeared 
to be very happy. At least Bruno 
Adamo, Frank Gallo, and Roy McLean 
were whistling while they worked. 

Stopping to peer into one of the of- 
fices, we spied William Riley, head of 
the employment department, sleeping 
soundly. Manuel Amaral and Harley 
Mitchell, who had been busily painting a 
sign, now admired their handiwork and 
hung it on the door of Riley's office. 
Approaching, we read: "Out of Order"! ! 

We started back to our plane. On the 
way Agnes passed a newspaper stand 
owned by Peter Sylvia and Mary Nick- 
erson, and here Agnes, with the idea of 
improving our minds, purchased a 
paper. Then we scrambled into the 
nlane, each clutching her favorite sec- 
tion of the paper. 

"Make the next stop Washington. 
Audrey," called Aggie. "It must be very 
exciting there with national elections 
impending! This paper savs that Robert 
Briggs, renowned Harvard professor, is 
the candidate of the "Never Sav Die" 
party, and his brisk manner, tireless 
energy, and fine intellect, are certain to 
impress the electorate. Harold Scheid, 
our senior class president, is the candi- 
date for the "Straight from the Shoul- 
der" party; Scheid has made some really 
brilliant speeches, and he intends to win 
— slowly but surely! 

Margaret looked up from her paper, 
"Here's something about Representative 
Mongan. He has little to say about the 
election, and consistently refuses to fore- 
cast its result. Both Briggs and Scheid 



are good friends of his. Perhaps Mon- 
gan is too much occupied with his social 
obligations in the capital to be deeply 
concerned about the presidential cam- 
paign." 

"Who says so?" I asked. 

"Editor Stanley Cook! Stanley is no 
longer the dashing Romeo of our school 
days. He now advocates social reform 
with great determination, and is as well- 
known for his vigorous writing as West- 
brook Pegler was twelve years ago. 

Also on the staff of the paper we 
found some classmates who had entered 
the field of journalism. Helen Hamilton 
was both the beauty editor and fashion 
reviewer. Barbara Kritzmacher was in 
charge of the household department, and 
took great satisfaction in offering each 
day new receipes which she had glee- 
fully concocted ten minutes before they 
went to press. Clifford Sampson was 
the star reporter, and Barbara Griswold 
had made a great success of her column, 
"Advice to the Lovelorn." Charles Anti 
did a comic strip, and we observed with 
some dismay that his characters were 
still using jokes he had tried out on us 
years ago! 

We arrived in Washington in the 
midst of a riot. People were gathered on 
the sidewalks watching a group of wo- 
men who were carrying large signs say- 
ing, "We want our rights. We'll finish 
the fight that started seventy years ago." 

The onlookers were very much 
amused by all this. The leader was 
Lillian Coggeshall, at her best when in- 
volved in a really heated argument. She 
was the women's candidate for Presi- 
dent. Eleanor Welch was busily pass- 
ing pamphlets among the people. The 
women thought that the men had been 
the pants of the federal government 
long enough, and that it was time that 
the petticoats demonstrated how the job 
should be done. Among the group of 
determined feminists we saw Elizabeth 
Dupuis, Josephine Morini, and Elizabeth 
Covell. Lawyers Anna Bagni and Dor- 
othy Musto, prepared for any opposition, 
followed the group in a large, yellow 
limousine. 

Hearing the scream of police sirens, 
we ran to our plane for safety. We 
would visit Washington, D. C, at some 
other time when the lid was off the pot 
and the water couldn't boil so vigor- 
ously! That was a wise decision, for we 
later learned that so furious a battle had 
occurred that patrolmen Henry Darsch, 
Alfred Sitta, and Peter Sa were injured 
Continued on Page 10 



THE PILGRIM 



^WS. S^T&"D *?*\T"£"EL. 



Old Colony & Ncwpor Railroad 

On and after -Monday, Nov. , 1 1869, 
TRAINS LEAVE BOSTON FOR 

Plymouth, P a in ; 2. 30, and 5. p m. 
TRAINS FOR BOSTON LEAVE 

Plymouth, 6 . 40, 9 . 30, a m j 3 .40 p m 

"W. H. Bullock, Sup't. 

Boston, Oct. 25, 18G9. 

patent Sight for salis; 

An improvement upon the old Patent 
for manufacturing MaciiIKE Poetry hav- 
ing been made, and a ''caveat" tiled in the 
office at Washinglon. Rights lor States or 
counties will be sold at rates which cannot 
fail to secure immense profits, this mach- 
ine with the least possible cost for material 
will turn out according to the hand at the 
crank, from ten to twenty line per minute, 
of fully medium magazine qualities ; see 
specimen on first page of this issue. 

By applying a donkey engine contracts 
for supplying daily newspapers to the num- 
ber of ten or more may be satisfactorily 

CXGCLltGCl 

The Publishers of "The Sand Piper" 
have consented to act as our agents iu the 
sale of this Patent, otf. 



WANTED. 

This is in earnest. 
Foreigu and Native Butter-flies aud 
Bugs. The undersigned will pay a fair 
price for all foreign and rare Native But- 
terflies and Bugs. For further particulars, 
apply at the office of '-The Sand Piper"' 
or to A. W. W. P. O. Box 5140, 
if. Boston, Mass. 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS, 

Mo. ISO Broadway, Mew York. 




MAN 
OWN 



< 
a. 



The American Fire Extinguisher. 

A machine which can be carried on the baek of a 
man to any part of the house; is charged with 
gas, always ready for instant use: and has been 
proved in hundreds of cases capable of extinguish- 
ing in a few minutes a large fire! The a- 

bove picture is only inserted to draw atten- 
tion to this notice ; and also to shew what the 
machine isn't. 



Personal. 

Information wanted, concerning the 
whereabouts and occupation of one Gar- 
nett Munn, who left Sutton in March, 1869, 
and has never been heard ol since. 

He will be, known by these characteris- 
tics, viz : he is apt to be asleep when any- 
thing "happens", yet he is wide awake at 
catching rabbits and those who hang "May 
Baskets." 




Wanted! 

For life a wife, wao loves 
duty more than beauty; aud 
who is anxious to sacrifice her- 
self on the altar of domestic af- 
fection. (I have 13 small chil- 
dren, yearning for a mother's 
love.) Address, "Paterual," 
Plymouth, P. O. 



WANTED! 



WANTED! 



Subscribers and advertisements for Thk 
Sand Piper. Also orders for light job work. 

Stories, anecdotes, and other contribu- 
tions thankfully received by 

The Editors. 



TO LET 
OR 




FOR §ALE 

CHEAP. 



Cap't Dandelion's Yacht, "Kitty Gale." 
Clipper built, »>0 tons burden, and in 
good condition every way. For further 
particulars, Apply to March Gale. 




$20 REWARD ! ! ! 

Is now offered by the owner 
of Ac dog that did not catch the rabbit that 
has lately been lost, for any dog that may 
in any way excel in fox hunting. He is un- 
able to do well without such help. 

THE SAND PIPER. 

A MONTHLY NEWSPAPER. 

Terms In Advance ; — Fifty cents for one 
year. Five cents per copy. 
Syg" Advertisements inserted for 20 cents 
per square, 10 cents after first insertion or 
2 cents per line. 

Postage ; 24 cents for the year ; pay- 
able at the office where received or sent 
with the subscription it desired. 

S5*rSpecimen copies of the Sand Piper 
will be sent free on applcation 

To subscribers. — Persons ordering a 
change in the direction of this paper should 
give the old as well as the new addi-ess. 

[Please make some allowance for our 
present inexperience iu printing. — Ed. J 



THE PILGRIM 




Tttfc SKNDP1PE.R 



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.FOR SALE ! 

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g"iven away! Iktmany <M>ol<a 
TCunt" spoiling* Hike stmip. Aiijpjkr 
toMlss Bafu-cker. 

Position to te tilled — 

45<ekeis o! all sJrWpes , sizes, 
4-yipesjajm.al caioirs JFw flLjMifflS^ 

Kelly. 



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A <c<D>mii|ple1te *«^ ®1 ^®® 
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tke prajvcrkial kays4ack. 

A arrarw.p> off at lea.*4 4eim 
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Pad 



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4© - me« 

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te.a.ckes'' wk© k.a.4 lakeM. «*. 
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By Miss JmsM-'te 

Twtik <d®wim F.Go aksew'iks'a; 

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^«e Miss TLautT.g'i &• a«a 7 

y. M.S. 

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i»all|p**'4s jIibi-wW' 

See Mi^Alkef^lira*---- 



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cJka.ly -mnielaaliieSo 

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10 



THE PILGRIM 



Continued from Page 7 
in the struggle to get the women into 
the patrol wagon. Ringleaders Virginia 
Mitchell and Charlotte Raymond were 
f ned fifty cents and sentenced to a night 
in jail by Judge Charles Anderson. 
Sybil Feinberg, lawyer, rushed down 
from New York to defend the women 
and to try to persuade the judge to 
change his decision, but he merely 
smiled at her patiently. The next day 
one candidate quietly dropped out of the 
campaign for President. 

Audrey's plane was spectacular! Not 
only did it have speed to burn, but it 
contained conveniences that were finer 
than those to be found in most homes. 
We had just about time to eat, prink, 
and change our clothes before we 
reached Detroit, where we were eager to 
visit the Davidson and Walker automo- 
bile plants where the monthly style 
show was being held. Their cars were 
the last word in streamlined perfection, 
and we desired especially to meet the 
designers. 

Reaching the plant, we were taken to 
the main offices after we had been 
searched by two officers who were on 
guard at the gate. Guards Paul Samp- 
son and Allen Wall decided that it would 
be permissible for us to inspect the 
plant, and Gilbert Tavares. another of 
the husky guards, all of whom thought 
they were little tough guys in society, 
was detailed to show us around. We 
passed through room after room where 
girls were working busily. In fact, it 
wasn't long before we realized that only 
girls were employed in these offices — 
and all pulse-warming de-icers at that. 

In one of the offices we saw Michelena 
Ruggiero, energetically snapping gum 
and displaying her new suit to Enis 
Capozucca and Aurora Janeiro. Sud- 
denly, the appearance of Lillian Hall, 
personnel director, brought a sharp 
change in the atmosphere. Miss Hall, 
who believed in meeting life's crises 
sensibly, walked slowly up and down 
the aisles, and severely reprimanded 
Louise Perrault, who was engaged in 
combing her golden locks. Miss Hall 
decided that the flibbertigibbety girls 
needed a talk on business etiquette, and 
we heard just a bit, but enough, of her 
rousing speech before we faded out. 

Olga Montali, secretary to Walker, led 
us into his office. The room was start- 
ling. We saw none of the conventional 
equipment, but instead, comfortable 
divans and chairs, a few tables, and a 



huge blackboard at one end of the room. 
Oliver Davidson and Charles Walker, 
owners of this plant, were sitting around 
a table, with Harris Frim, treasurer, of 
the company, and Robert Tedeschi, tak- 
ing notes on the discussion. The men 
were gazing rapturously at a group of 
models whom they had hired to pose 
beside their cars for advertising pur- 
poses. The girls strolled lingeringly 
around the room. 

"Phemie" Gascoyne, famous sports 
star, who was roughing up her back 
hair, was first. Following her came Bar- 
bara Harlow, Glamour Girl No. 999, 
swathed in silver fox furs and weaving 
towards her two would-be employers 
like a big moment just coming into their 
lives. Louise Bernagozzi, waving her 
eyelashes, and Dorothy Wollaston, flash- 
ing that "Kiss-me-kid" look, walked 
with assurance in front of Grace Dick- 
son, "Miss America of 1952." Unable to 
choose from among them, Walker and 
Davidson hired all the girls. 

During the beauty parade two men 
had entered the room. Walking to the 
blackboard, they proceeded to make 
fantastic sketches, quite unconcerned 
with the display of pulchritude. Ob- 
viously they had become immune to 
woman's helplessly adoring expression 
and crafty wiles. The great designers 
were none other than Gabriel Luiz and 
Tony Carbone. The girls, all of whom 
believed that men were convenient to 
have around, immediately clustered 
about them and begged to have their 
pictures drawn. The room had been in 
an uproar when we entered, and we had 
come in unnoticed. We left unnoticed. 

Peering anxiously around for Miss 
Barlow, who had slipped away in the 
confusion, we found her surrounded by a 
group of workers. Edging into the 
circle, we beheld her teaching them how 
to dance. We saw Everett Lanman, 
Charles Tavares, and Bob Fortini watch- 
ing with animation as swing began to 
sway their souls. The group quickly 
dispersed when the foreman, Arthur 
Ruemker, appeared and scolded them 
with the quiet pleasure of a person 
twisting a knife in a wound. Miss Pozzi 
pulled Agnes away impatiently, and we 
departed. 

A few hours later, entering Dallas, 
Texas, we found a deserted city, where 
only stragglers were to be seen on the 
street. A ghost town, we thought, but 
we could hear the echo of faint cheering 
and we walked in the direction from 
Continued on Page 25 



No record here of things they've done; 
We only seek to have somz fun. 



BRUNO ADAMO 

Bruno's not behind the times 
When he goes to get his 

"date," 
He needs no bicycle for two, 
He sports a Ford V-8. 



CHARLOTTE ADAMS 

From small people 
Come great things, 
Charlotte proves this 
When she sings. 



GERALD ALBERTINI 

Laryngitis laid him low 

On his oral topic day, 

But, since tomorrow always 

comes, 
There was no escape that way. 



MANUEL AMARAL 

We've never seen Manny 
In the deep throes of choler. 
But he has his moments 
We'll bet you a dollar. 



CHARLES ANDERSON 

He's never been sidetracked: 
He knew that he wanted 
Good grades, and he got 

them — 
He's not to be daunted. 



CHARLES ANTI 

If he were in the appointed 

place 
At the appointed time. 
We would lack a subject 
For this humble rhyme. 




BLANCHE ARRUDA 

The Victorian maid 
Was shy and coy, 
Very good tactics 
When girl meets boy. 



ALFRED BABINI 

He hasn't got dimples, 
He hasn't got curls; 
But as football captain, 
He gets all the girls. 



ANNA BAGNI 

We never saw the heart- 
shaped face 
Of which the poet sings 
Till we inspected Anna — 
She owns one of the things. 



AGNES BARLOW 

Not one ounce of pretense, 
No feathers, no fuss — 
We think that she has 
Personality plus. 



LOUISE BERNAGOZZI 

In quiet meditation 
With serious concentration 
She works upon her notes: 
But we must all the truth re- 
veal. 
No history notes command 

such zeal — 
Upon love notes she dotes. 



DORRIS BLISS 

That you will bear gracefully 
As Editor-in-Chief 
Words of praise or censure 
Is our firm belief. 



12 



THE PILGRIM 



WARREN BORGATTI 

He's changed his mind 
About being late, 
It's really no trouble 
To be here at eight. 



CATHERINE BOUTIN 

We'd give hostage to fortune, 
A wealth of treasured stores — 
We'd give almost anything 
To own a smile like yours. 



JOHN BREWER 

Let the dead past bury its 

dead, 
Our faith in him is restored — 
Since that Day in Junior High 

School 
No speech has had him floored. 



ROBERT BRIGGS 

Some choose a mild and minc- 
ing gait, 
Some favor the sinuous glide, 
But he reaches his objective 
With a bold and vigorous 
stride. 



ROBERT CADORETTE 

We gaze at her in great sur- 
prise 

Unbelief is in our eyes — 

For when to her we bent to 
bow 

We found out Chicky was his 
cow. 



ENIS CAPOZUCCA 

If you chew two sticks a day, 
A pauper you will be — 
We feel you should be subsi- 
dized 
By Mr. William Wrigley. 




ANTHONY CARBONE 

Draw a schoolgirl's picture 
And win a schoolgirl's smile: 
It makes a smoothe approach, 

my lad — 
And that is most worth while. 



GEORGE CAVICCHI 

Once a week, we've noticed. 
He's an absentee — 
Can it be he seeks relief 
From our company? 



LOIS CHANDLER 

From the beginning to the end 
Of our high school days 
No act of yours need we de- 
fend. 
For you — only praise! 



LILLIAN COGGESHALL 

She will not long 
Succumb to sorrow. 
She knows the sun 
Will shine tomorrow. 



STANLEY COOK 

Look, look, lookie! 

Here comes Cookie, 

And he's not passing by — 

He's the treasurer of our class 

So we know the reason why. 



HAROLD CORVINI 

Since your father raises chick- 
ens 
And your brother deals in oil, 
We fancy you've already felt 
The dignity of toil. 



THE PILGRIM 



13 



ELIZABETH COVELL 

Though a secretary 

She may be, 

We'll remember her struggle 

In Typewriting III. 




HENRY DARSCH 

No Mitter we've found 
On land or sea — 
Unique we use 
With accuracy. 






OLIVER DAVIDSON 

Pardon my western accent, 
And forgive me my "Yes, 

ma'am;" 
Plymouth is not my birthplace, 
A Chicago lad I am. 





MARGARET DECOST 

She'll do an imitation, 
You may pay for what 

will — 
From Baby Snooks to Garbo 
Your requests she'll fill. 



you 




// 




GRACE DICKSON 

Half out of her chair 
She waits for the bell. 
But "Cookie" gets there 
Running pell mell. 





ELIZABETH DUPUIS 

What goes on within her heart 
We may never know ; 
Romantic may her ideas be. 
She won't tell us so. 





FRANK ENOS 

News test for him 
May be a game, 
We knew more joy 
Before they came. 



SYBIL FEINBERG 

Sybil's smile is winsome, 
Her voice is sweet and low — 
Sybil's hair — but why go on? 
Sybil's nice to know. 



EDWARD FERNANDES 

Green striped pants and jack- 
et gay 
We recognize as his — 
So Edward tries to brighten 
The corner where he is. 



ROBERT FORTINI 

Step right this way! 

You'll want to meet 

Our class plutocrat; 

The fact he has a private car 

Is proof enough of that. 



HARRIS FRIM 

He shows no vulnerability . 

To feminine advances — 

He means to climb the road to 

fame 
With naught to spoil his 

chances. 



FRANK GALLO 

Older, wiser men than he 
At Fortune rant and curse, 
But, when she frowns on him, 
He thinks, "It could be much 
worse." 



14 



THE PILGRIM 



JOHN GALLO 

He worked hard on the ad- 
vance sale 
Of tickets for our dance. 
He isn't one who likes to leave 
Everything to chance. 





ALPHONSE GAMBINI 

If the day should ever come 
When we lack bread and meat. 
We'd bank on past acquain- 
tance : 
We'd know just where to eat. 





OLGA GUIDABONI 

We've questioned her and 

others, 
But no matter how we try 
We cannot learn the reason 

for 
That twinkle in her eye. 



RALPH HALE 

Ralphie's hobby is setting 
traps 

Around some shady pool. 

He wants to catch some musk- 
rats 

To show before the school. 



WARREN GARUTI 

If he labored as hard at his 

lessons 
As he does at basketball, 
We believe it would be quite 

possible 
For him to surprise us all. 




LILLIAN HALL 

Four walls may make a hall — 
Still no hall but her could hold 
Such wholly boundless energy 
Combined with a heart of 
gold! 



EUPHEMIA GASCOYNE 

If she plays in life 
As she plays in a game, 
"Here is a winner!" 
We proudly proclaim. 





PHYLLIS GOLDSTEIN 

Ah! sweet mystery of life. 
You won't envelop me; 
Cupid's dart I can avoid 
For me a career there'll be. 





HELEN HAMILTON 

We think you should take les- 
sons 

From a man named Scheid; 

He could teach you how to 
speak 

To wake the countryside. 



BARBARA HARLOW 

Cheerful, but not capricious 
Alert, but not suspicious 
Able, but not officious 
Class '40 Secretary. 



BARBARA GRISWOLD 

If you do not believe her, 
You're naught but a dolt — 
More flies can be caught 
With sugar than salt. 





LAURA HEATH 

She rolls her eyes ecstatically, 
She chafes at slight delay — 
The reason for her restless- 
ness? 
Why — Googy's on his way. 



THE PILGRIM 



15 



AURISSA HOLMES 

I decide what I want, 
And then I go get it; 
Determined am I 
To get my due credit. 





JULIA HOLMES 

What Cedarville has 
That Plymouth lacks 
Is stranger to us 
Than Ripley's facts. 




WILLIAM IDE 

"Books may be important. 
School may be very good; 
It's O. K. if you like 'em, 
But I just never could." 




FRANCIS INGENITO 

Among his classmates he has 

earned 
A place that few could fill; 
On numerous committees 
He has labored with a will. 




PASQUALE IODICE 

If you'd know 
How polite he can be, 
You'll have to go. 
To the O. C. T. 



EUGENIA IZZO 

Look not for her on the middle 

road, 
For you'll not find her there; 
But search the peaks of ec- 

StELCV 

Or the very depths of despair. 



AURORA JANEIRO 

"I can't help it," says Loli, 
"If my stature is so low — 
I've thought so much of other 

things 
I quite forgot to grow." 




DOROTHY JESSE 

A light brown station wagon 
Goes rolling down the lane, 
Dottie and her sisters 
Are on the go again. 




BARBARA KRITZMACHER 

Life's not meant for worry, 
But for laughter and for fun. 
Why succumb to grief and 

tears? 
Of troubles, she'll have none. 




EVERETT LANMAN 

Bashful he may be, 
But we think not 
In spite of the fact 
That he blushes a lot. 




GABRIEL LUIZ 

In a dozen pretty girls 

He finds a subject fit to paint; 

As for flowers and for still- 
life, 

He declares that they just 
ain't. 



ELSIE LUZ 

She will not leave the class- 
room, 
But lingers for a while 
Until a certain red head 
Acknowledges her smile. 



16 



THE PILGRIM 



EDWARD MACCAFERRI 

His background is such 
That he thinks he can 
Prove the old saying, 
"Clothes make the man." 



THEODORA MALAGUTI 

We look twice 
And rub our eyes, 
But we approve 
Your present size. 



AUDREY MALOON 

My key to success? 
Pray don't be absurd! 
Of none but hard work 
Have I ever heard. 



DONALD MacDONALD 

"There was ease in Casey's 

manner t 
As he stepped up to the plate," 
But MacDonald could beat 

Casey 
We confidently state. 



CHARLOTE McILVANA 

No spotlight for her! 
Its pitiless glare 
Is one of the things 
She refuses to bear. 



ROY McLEAN 

He's the Excalibur 

Of all the young blades 

Who've passed through 

portals 
Within two decades. 



our 




ALDEN MITCHELL 

John Alden's method 
He won't adopt — 
He'll "speak for himself"— 
He just won't be stopped! 



HARLEY MITCHELL 

He goes about his business 
In an unpretentious way. 
And honestly accomplishes 
The dictates of each day. 



VIRGINIA MITCHELL 

Whenever we're in trouble 
And don't know what is which. 
We know we're not entirely 

lost: 
We look for help from Mitch. 



EDGAR MONGAN 

The star he's hitched his 

wagon to 
Dossn't twinkle in the sky. 
She's a member of the Junior 

class, 
So he's much closer by. 



LOUIS MONTALI 

Imagination fails us! 

We are in despair 

When we try to picture Louis 

At fifty — with no hair. 



OLGA MONTALI 

You may be inclined 

To think her naive. 

But watch her when school's 

out: 
What a shock you'll receive! 



THE PILGRIM 



17 



GLORIA MORELLI 

Gogo, like Jack Horner, 
Has her thumb in every pie, 
Or if, by chance, she hasn't, 
She'll know the reason why. 



GEORGE MORGADO 

This is really 
Hard to get; 
She's his Scarlett, 
He's her Rhett. 



JOSEPHINE MORINI 

Are you having any fun? 
Now don't you be a dunce. 
Why study so relentlessly? 
You know you're young but 
once. 



LEWIS MORTON 

Though rough the way 

And dark the day 

No cause for wild alarm — 

He'll face what strife 

Must come in life 

With dignity and calm. 



GEORGE MOSKOS 

"Veni, vidi, vici," 
Says he of his Latin test — 
And he's no idle boaster. 
He just likes to do his best. 



HELEN MURRAY 

Cupid, Cupid, I've been think- 
ing 
That my life would be inane 
If it were not for your arrow — 
Must I really wait in vain? 




DOROTHY MUSTO 

Chatterbox, chatterbox, 
All the day long — 
But no more of the words 
Can we use from the song. 



CHARLES NICKERSON 

With rod and gun he proudly 

proves 
Himself to be a winner, 
And many a girl would gladly 

serve 
A duck for Sunday dinner. 



MARY NICKERSON 

Shorthand is not easy 
Though she does her very best, 
But we give credit where it's 

due — 
She'll always pass the test. 



GENEVIEVE PATTURELLI 

She has so many trinkets 
She ought to start a store; 
Just as soon as one's been 

worn, 
She buys herself some more. 



MILTON PENN 

He refuses 

To fume and fret, 

He's the happiest person 

We've ever met. 



LOUISE PERRAULT 

As delightful as the morning, 
As refreshing as the rain, 
And still she can be practical — 
She is no scatterbrain. 



18 



THE PILGRIM 



MELQUEZIDEQUE PERRY 

He tries to look angelic, 
Violin beneath his chin — 
But from us he cannot hide 
The impishness in him. 




DOROTHY J. PETERSON 

We've no complaint 
About your size, 
It has an advantage 
If you are wise. 




DOROTHY M. PETERSON 

Curlylocks, curlyloeks, 
Your golden crop of curls 
Is, you know, the envy of 
All the other girls. 




THOMAS PIMENTAL 

Work is fatiguing, 

Flirting is fun; 

Make hay while the sun shines. 

Day is soon done. 




TINA POZZI 

Tina's wavy hair 
Tina's sparkling eye 
Tina's gleaming teeth 
Are not easily passed by. 




ANGELO PROVINZANO 

Let it be classical, 
Let it be swing, 
Duffy's right there 
Having his fling. 









GEORGE RANDALL 

We've been told that players 

Never hear the crowd's ac- 
claim : 

But we know he heeds the 
cheers 

Of one girl we could name. 



CHARLOTTE RAYMOND 

"Little pitchers have big ears." 
At least, so we've been told; 
Perhaps for us she'd check the 

truth 
Of this adage old. 



BELLA REZENDES 

She has no Sir Echo, 
She doesn't need one — 
When she yells for Plymouth. 
The job is well done. 



FLORENCE RICHMOND 

Come rain, come shine 
She doesn't mind — 
She comes to us 
On the Manomet bus. 



RUTH and WILLIAM RILEY 

This little girl liked to study 
While this little boy liked to 

play. 
They couldn't do both together 
So they compromised one day. 
Now Ruthie helps her brother 
While he tries to be good. 
Then they both trot off to 

play land 
And behave as all twins should. 



THE PILGRIM 



19 



BETTY ROBBINS 

Here restraint is 
Omnipresent, 
She is never 
Effervescent. 



HAROLD ROGERS 

He baffles us: 
For no apparent reason 
He becomes a different boy 
When basketball's in season. 



MARGARET RONCARATI 

You're a sweet little heartache, 
As cute as cute can be, 
To know her is to love her 
As ardently as we. 



LOIS ROVATTI 

Although we all agree that 
In sports you're at your best, 
You really don't do badly 
In any kind of test. 



ARTHUR RUEMKER 

We've never seen him smile. 
We've never seen him gay, 
But he must find his pleasure 
In his own peculiar way. 



MICHELENA RUGGIERO 

Mickey chewed some gum one 

day 
Which was against the rule — 
She had to throw that piece 

away 
And chew twenty after school. 




CAROLINE RUSSELL 

Red sails in the sunset 
Out where she longs to be 
Sailing her good ship "Scaup' 
Over the deep blue sea. 



FRANCES RYAN 

From dawn to dark 
His praise she sings, 
But he is her brother, 
Her king of kings. 



PETER SA 

By wheeze of harmonica 
And strum of guitar 
His presence on Cherry Street 
Is known from afar. 



JOHN ST. GEORGE 

His conduct is such 

That he must have accepted 

The very advice 

That Laertes rejected. 



CLIFFORD SAMPSON 

As ticket sellers our class isn't 
Mr. Mongan's pride and joy, 
But we can find throughout 

this school 
No equal to this boy. 



PAUL SAMPSON 

Let no Delilah string a line 
To learn the cause of your 

strength, 
Like Samson's it lies in your 

hair — 
In color — not in length. 



20 



THE PILGRIM 



VIRGINIA SAMPSON 

Books and games were once 

her world, 
There were no other things — 
Now she lends a willing ear 
To the song the tuba sings. 



HAROLD SCHEID 

In the midde of a dream, 
Hidden behind his hand, 
On the beautiful isle of some- 
where 
He's in a foreign land. 



BARBARA SHERMAN 

"Silver threads among the 

gold, 
If my life I give to books," 
Boys, don't let her anyhow, 
'Tis said that this girl cooks. 



DOROTHY SILVA 

That she's not ultra-modern 
Is a fact we all well know, 
For on her comely features 
Cosmetics never show. 



ALFRED SITTA 

Do you like things 
That are cold and bitter? 
"I like 'em hot!" 
Says Alfred Sitta. 



LESLIE SMITH 

Through silent corridors 
On pussyfoot feet 
While the rest of us study 
He covers his beat. 




RONALD SMITH 

Give him a story to write 
And he will earn his B — 
His style is unpretentious, 
But it suits us to a T. 



MARY SOUZA 

Trim and sedate, 
Right on her toes — 
Welcome as sunshine 
Wherever she goes. 



OLGA STANGHELLINI 

Her wit is dry, 
Her humor sly — 
But a kind heart 
Her words belie. 



UMBERTO STANGELLINI 

To say he craves his name in 

lights 
Is not just idle chatter — 
And we acclaimed him to the 

skies 
In his role as "Poppa Hatter." 



PETER SYLVIA 

If facts or figures you desire 

In sports of any kind, 

You needn't seek a record 

book — 
He has them in his mind. 



CHARLES TAVARES 

He had planned to graduate 
With the class of '39, 
Then he reconsidered — 
He found us rather fine. 



THE PILGRIM 



21 



GILBERT TAVARES 

He played "Mugzie" 
With such finish 
James Cagney's fame 
Will now diminish. 



ROBERT TAVERNELLI 

That he's a jolly good fellow 
Let no one here deny — 
We can find no glaring fault 
No matter how we pry. 



ROBERT TEDESCHI 

You can't find Robert? 
We're most sympathetic, 
But didn't you know 
That he's peripatetic? 



MARTHA TEXEIRA 

"The time has come," the 

seniors said, 
"To think of many things: 
Of Martha and her basketball 
We think the nicest things." 



ANNA THIMAS 

By no conceivable reasoning 
Can we hold you to blame 
For the fact that many teach- 
ers 
Mispronounce your name. 



RICHARD VAUGHAN 

Raleigh founded the colony, 
Richard discovered the girl: 
Sharper darts than this we 

lack 
At this boy to hurl. 




CHARLES WALKER 

The leopard cannot change his 

spots, 
At least so we have read — 
But when we look at Charlie, 
We fear we've been misled. 



ALLEN WALL 

We hope the weapons that he 

draws 
Are no indication 
Of the course that he'll pursue 
After graduation. 



BEATRICE WEST 

Moderate is her middle name. 
We've noticed this, to wit: 
When opening a school book 
She takes her time at it. 



ELEANOR WELCH 

"Late to bed 
And late to rise" — 
The standard version 
She decries. 



DOROTHEA WOLLASTON 

If you ever go to Plympton 
To breathe the country air, 
Look up and down the main 

street 
And you'll find Dolly there. 



COLBURN WOOD 

Useless, I find it, 
To hurry and skurry; 
I make haste slowly, 
Refusing to worry. 



22 



THE PILGRIM 



NELLIE YOUNGMAN 

She can bake a fine cake, 
She can sew a fine seam — 
To a thoughtful young man 
These real virtues would seem. 




ALTON ZANEBONI 

No use for Kreml 
Or other tonic, 
So short his hair 
It won't stay on it. 



THE PRINCIPAL SPEAKS 

"J^NOW thyself"— yet who does? Of 
all the complexities on this earth 
none surpasses the human spirit. And 
none so richly rewards study by sustain- 
ing interest and increasing wisdom. The 
Senior Class has chosen a fine motto. 

It is also a very old one. The Greeks, 
I believe, built a whole system of edu- 
cation on it, which is a tribute to its use- 
fulness as well as its antiquity. They 
discovered (and I suspect that other 
peoples before them, back to that twi- 
light time before the dawn of history, 
discovered it also) what every thought- 
ful man discovers for himself, that no 
matter what qualities of body and mind 
a man may possess, one quality must 
underwrite them all if they are to reach 
their greatest effectiveness. Courage is 
that quality. 

Without courage tact may be no more 
than cowardice; forbearance, weakness; 
generosity, a covert form of bribery. 
And strength without courage may be- 
come merely contemptible bullying. 

Consider the past year. When school 
began here last September, war began 
in Europe. It dragged along in the west 
for three months only to burst out with 
savage violence in the north. As our 
Thanksgiving season ended, bombs were 
raining on Finland. Now that war is 
over, and as I write these words, a 
shameful peace is about to be imposed 
on a gallant nation. Finland has been 
defeated. But no man possessed of any 
self-respect would hesitate to take his 
stand with the Finns in that defeat, and 
be proud to stand there in defeat. For 
the Finns possess courage. Does anyone 
envy their conquerors? 

When the threat of this war lay over 
the land, the Finns, an intelligent people, 
knew the overwhelming odds against 
them. They knew that, hemmed in as 
they were by unscrupulous enemies, 
separated from their fearful friends, 
they could expect but little assistance 
should war come. But they also knew 
themselves. They knew their national 



honor, their integrity, their ideals, their 
very existence would be at stake — and 
they knew they possessed the courage to 
defend these. It must have been a source 
of strength and comfort to them as in- 
dividuals to know that as a nation they 
possessed the inner resources of the 
spirit which could and would sustain 
them in adversity. 

And to a man or a boy, to a woman or 
a girl, to each of us in his station as the 
trials of life press in to overwhelm, such 
knowledge can be "a prop and a stay." 
We must examine ourselves, discover 
our resources, and supply such lacks as 
the examination discloses. Should cour- 
age be among these, we must work to 
increase it, for courage is a quality which 
grows readily if the will be resolute. Re- 
member the Finns and fear no defeat. 
Even defeat can be glorious — with 
courage. 



OUR HERITAGE 

A heritage is ours to guard: 

The mighty deeds our sires 

wrought, 
Those pioneers of ancient days. 
Who on these shores their freedom 

sought. 

No suffering, sacrifice, or death 
Could their brave hearts dismay; 
Their vision of democracy 
Is our birthright today. 

At tyrant's frown we do not quake. 
Nor live like slaves on bended knee; 
We stand erect, with courage 

strong, 
To guard our sacred liberty. 

If to our heritage we're true, 
We shall live in brotherhood, 
One aim through all the coming 

years — 
Our country's greatest good. 

Ronald Smith '40 



THE PILGRIM 23 



o Know Thyself 



BRUNO ADAMO Little tasks make large returns. 

CHARLOTTE ADAMS Much may be said on both sides. 

GERALD ALBERTINI He knew the precise moment when to say nothing. 

MANUEL AMARAL He was wont to speak plain and to the purpose. 

CHARLES ANDERSON Not stepping o'er the bounds of modesty 

CHARLES ANTI Cookery is become an art; cooks are gentlemen. 

BLANCHE ARRUDA A face with gladness overspread 

ALFRED BABINI Great let me call him, for he conquered me. 

ANNA BAGNI Deeds, not words 

AGNES BARLOW Youth had been a habit of hers for so long, that she could not 

part with it. 

LOUISE BERNAGOZZI Women's hearts are always soft; would that men's were truer. 

DORRIS BLISS Soft as some song divine thy story flows. 

WARREN BORGATTI If all the year were playing holidays! 

CATHERINE BOUTIN Silence is more eloquent than words. 

JOHN BREWER I must be measured by my soul; the mind's the standard of the 

man. 

ROBERT BRIGGS This world belongs to the energetic. 

ROBERT CADORETTE There's fun in everything we meet. 

ENIS CAPOZUCCA The shortest answer is doing. 

ANTHONY CARBONE I know a trick worth two of that. 

GEORGE CAVICCHI Without music life would be a mistake. 

LOIS CHANDLER I take the world to be but as a stage. 

LILLIAN COGGESHALL .... Absence makes the heart grow fonder. 

STANLEY COOK From the crown of his head to the sole of his foot he is all mirth. 

HAROLD CORVINI It is not art, but heart, which wins the wide world over. 

ELIZABETH COVELL A sweet attractive kind of grace, and full assurance 

HENRY DARSCH The sporting man's sense of luck and chance 

OLIVER DAVIDSON Young Lochinvar is come out of the West. 

MARGARET DeCOST Charm strikes the sight, but merit wins the soul. 

GRACE DICKSON They who are pleased themselves must always please. 

ELIZABETH DUPUIS What sweet delight a quiet life affords ! 

FRANK ENOS The newspaper press is the people's university. 

SYBIL FEINBERG A still small voice 

EDWARD FERNANDES Show me a man's handwriting, and I will tell you his character. 

ROBERT FORTINI While I at length debate, and beat about the bush 

HARRIS FRIM The lion is not so fierce as they paint him. 

FRANK GALLO Men of few words are the best men. 

JOHN GALLO Men are merriest when they're far from home. 

ALFONSE GAMBINI They that govern the most make the least noise. 

WARREN GARUTI You believe easily what you hope for earnestly. 

EUPHEMIA GASCOYNE The blush is beautiful but sometimes inconvenient. 

PHYLLIS GOLDSTEIN Happiness consists in activity. 

BARBARA GRISWOLD The most effective coquetry is innocence. 

OLGA GUIDABONI This little speck — 'tis but a freckle, — never mind it. 

RALPH HALE Moderation, the noblest gift of Heaven 

LILLIAN HALL How much lies in laughter! 

HELEN HAMILTON Made poetry a mere mechanic art! 

BARBARA HARLOW Obliging and cheerful; industrious and kind 

LAURA HEATH .... The sunshine of life is made up of very little beams that are 

bright all the time. 

AURISSA HOLMES For smiles from reasons flow. 

JULIA HOLMES A friend indeed 

WILLIAM IDE How the teacher's doctrine, sanctified by truth, shall spread! 

FRANK INGENITO I wish he would explain his exDlanation. 

PASQUALE IODICE I do not like noise unless I make it. 

EUGENIA IZZO Her frowns are fairer far than smiles of other maidens are. 

AURORA JANEIRO The daughter of debate 

DOROTHY JESSE Her thoughts are often original. 

BARBARA KRITZMACHER The mirth and fun grew fast and furious. 

EVERETT LANMAN Smies with intent to do mischief 

GABRIEL LUIZ He is full of smiles and he salutes everyone he meets. 



24 THE PILGRIM 



ELSIE LUZ Accuracy is the twin brother of honesty. 

EDWARD MACCAFERRI ... Dandies, when first rate, are very agreeable men. 

THEODORA MALAGUTI Blessed with that charm, the certainty to please 

AUDREY MALOON Thy modesty's a candle to thy merit. 

DONALD MacDONALD By sports like these are all his cares beguiled. 

CHARLOTTE McILVANA . Silence is golden. 

ROY McLEAN With his hair around his placid temples curled 

ALDEN MITCHELL How fast has brother followed brother! 

HARLEY MITCHELL For 'tis a snort to be an engineer. 

VIRGINIA MITCHELL Doing easily what others find difficult 

EDGAR MONGAN The thorn in the cushion of the editorial chair 

LOUIS MONTALI In company a very pleasant fellow 

OLGA MONTALI For happiness was born a twin. 

GLORIA MORELLI How long the audience sits before us ! 

GEORGE MORGARDO The course of true love never did run smooth. 

JOSEPHINE MORINI Mingle your joys sometimes with your earnest occupation. 

LEWIS MORTON Attending, as if their lives were on his words depending 

GEORGE MOSKOS ......... Bashfulness is an ornament to youth. 

KATHLEEN MURRAY In silence also there's a worth that brings no risk. 

DOROTHY MUSTO Lingering for a moment's harmless chatter 

CHARLES NICKERSON . .... A little nonsense now and then is pleasant. 

MARY NICKERSON She doeth little kindnesses which most leave undone. 

GENEVIEVE PATTURELLI All musical people seem to be happy. 

MILTON PENN He'll find a way. 

LOUISE PERRAULT Festively she puts forth in trim array. 

MELQUEZEDIQUE PERRY He was a fiddler and consequently a rogue. 

DOROTHY J. PETERSON Don't let your simplicity be imposed on. 

DOROTHY M. PETERSON . As merry as the day is long 

THOMAS PIMENTAL Variety is the spice of life. 

TINA POZZI Good taste is the flower of good sense. 

ANGELO PROVINZANO On with the dance! 

GEORGE RANDALL My dancing days are done. 

CHARLOTTE RAYMOND How sweet and gracious, even in common speech! 

WILLIAM RILEY I could be well content to entertain my life with quiet hours. 

BELLA REZENDES Let the far and the near all unite, with a cheer. 

FLORENCE RICHMOND The hair is the richest ornament of woman. 

RUTH RILEY The spectacles of books 

BETSEY ROBBINS Maiden with the meek brown eyes 

HAROLD ROGERS Play up, play up, and play the game. 

MARGARET RONCARATI . And poets by their suffering grow. 

LOIS ROVATTI We have met the enemy, and they are ours. 

ARTHUR RUEMKER Strange to the world, he wore a bashful look. 

MICHELENA RUGGIERO A dancing shape, an image gay, to haunt, to startle, and waylay 

CAROLINE RUSSELL Reproof on her lip but a smile in her eye 

FRANCES RYAN Your heart's desires be with you. 

PETER SA Months passed and his hair grew curlier. 

JOHN ST. GEORGE Work for the work's sake. 

CLIFFORD SAMPSON Whatever is worth doing at all is worth doing well. 

PAUL SAMPSON All joking set aside 

VIRGINIA SAMPSON Is there a heart that music cannot melt? 

HAROLD SCHEID From him shall read the perfect ways of honor. 

BARBARA SHERMAN Be as merry as ever you can. 

DOROTHY SILVA Of manners gentle ; of affections mild 

ALFRED SITTA Music is the prophet's art, one of the most magnificent. 

BRADFORD SMITH But there's a good time coming. 

RONALD SMITH Taste the joys that spring from labor. 

MARY SOUZA Here is a dear and true industrious friend. 

OLGA STANGHELLINI A penny for your thoughts 

UMBERTO STANGHELLINI . Bait the hook well; those fish will bite. 

PETER SYLVIA For good things come in small packages. 

CHARLES TAVARES Silence is the perfectest herald of joy. 

GILBERT TAVARES And life is itself but a game of football. 

ROBERT TAVERNELLI I'm the sweetest sound in orchestra heard. 



THE PILGRIM 



25 



ROBERT TEDESCHI Business? It's quite simple. It's other people's money. 

MARTHA TEXEIRA To love a game beyond the prize 

ANNA THIMAS A crown, perhaps, upon my head, but a needle and thread in 

my hand 

RICHARD VAUGHAN Happiness seems made to be shared. 

CHARLES WALKER Go West, young man— go West. 

ALLEN WALL Modesty becomes a young man. 

BEATRICE WEST Laugh, and the world laughs with you. 

ELEANOR WELCH And lightly was her slender nose tip-tihed like the petal of a 

flower. 

DOROTHY WOLLASTON A merry heart that laughs at care 

COLBURN WOOD A-hunting we will go! 

NELLIE YOUNGMAN A busy bee has no time for sorrow. 

ALTON ZANIBONI For the apparel oft proclaims the man. 



Continued from Page 10 



which it came. We hadn't gone far when 
we heard a group of women coming 
towards us. 

One of the ladies approached me with 
outstretched hand. Her face seemed 
familiar, and then I recognized her as 
Julia Holmes. "I'm president of the 
Woman's Club. We heard that you were 
coming, and were preparing to meet 
you, but we didn't expect you so soon!' 

"This is most awkward." Margaret 
interrupted, feeling, as the rest of us did, 
like a wet shoe which nobody wants to 
wear. "Why, the city is as deserted as 
if we had brought the Black Plague." 

To mollify us Olga Stanghellini and 
Florence Richmond invited us to their 
tea room where Barbara Sherman was 
the cook, and George Cavicchi the dish 
washer, wiper, and breaker! After 
luncheon, we decided to go to the game. 
Here Martha Teixeira and Dorothy J. 
Peterson, who, because she still seemed 
no more than twelve, continued to 
attend the movies for a dime, supplied 
us with tickets. 

When we reached the stadium, we 
had some difficulty in getting to our 
seats. The place was jammed with 
excited people. In a frantic effort to 
reach my seat I stepped on Alden 
Mitchell, who was lying on the ground 
taking candid shots, and he looked at 
me with agonized eyes which seared my 
soul. 

Just outside the stadium we had seen 
George Morgardo and Edward Macca- 
ferri with their traveling clothing store. 
They had been selling white palm beach 
suits for players, and at that time I had 
begun to become a little suspicious of 
the game. 

Milton Penn had been standing in front 
of his store, waving his arms and de- 
nouncing men who travel about with 
portable clothing stores, but Morgardo 



and Maccaferri had paid no attention to 
him. A group of interested people had 
gathered around him, like a mob around 
a soap box orator, including Mayor Ron- 
ald Smith and some of his henchmen 
— Robert Cadorette, John Gallo, Colburn 
Wood, and Ralph Hale; all important in 
the political administration of the city. 
Laura H?ath, reporter, stood near Cath- 
erine Eoutin, cartoonist for one of the 
local papers, who was making a sketch 
of Pe:in, the mayor, and Maccaferri and 
Morgardo. After Penn had finished his 
harangue, some one sympathetically 
dropped a coin into his outstretched 
palm. A buddy, no doubt, of Morgardo 
and Maccaferri. 

We turned our attention to the game. 
There had been players out on the field 
now for some time, and I was waiting 
impatiently for the contest to start. 
There were men and women riding 
around on tiny motor bikes with tennis 
rackets in their hands, and they were 
batting a ball around the field. This was 
the modern version of football.- 

In the game we found more class- 
mates. Dorothy Jesse, Lois Rovatti, 
Blanche Arruda, and Elsie Luz were 
battling Curly Randall, Alfred Babini, 
and Alton Zaniboni. The women were 
doing very well for themselves. Donald 
MacDonaid was far out on the field try- 
ing in vain to repair a flat tire. He 
glanced angrily, in his Lord of the Manor 
way, at his team-mates, who refused to 
ctop to help him. Duffy Provinzano, 
waterboy, thinking that MacDonaid was 
hurt, went out and poured a pail of water 
down his back! The feud between Ran- 
dall, captain, and MacDonaid was evi- 
dent when Randall sent Mac out of the 
game. Coach Harold Rogers watched 
grimly from the sidelines. 

Captain Anna Thimas signaled to 
Kathleen Murray, manager, for substi- 



26 



THE PILGRIM 



tutes, and Caroline Russell, Virginia 
Sampson, and Bella Rezendes ran out on 
the field with their bikes. Promptly 
Edward Fernandes was sent into the 
game. The men needed help! 

I didn't particularly care for this type 
of football and was about to suggest 
leaving when a bottle hit me on the 
head. I turned angrily to the women 
behind me. Most vociferous of all was 
Betsey Holmes who still followed all 
the games, and beside her were Gene- 
vieve Patturelli, famous violinist, and 
Ruth Riley, principal of one of the local 
high schools. A few rows below me, I 
saw Dorothy Silva, dress designer, Phyl- 
lis Goldstein, hair stylist, and Olga 
Guidaboni, a jolly farmeress. 

We left the game when the referees, 
Pasquale Iodice and Theodora Malaguti, 
became involved in an argument over 
the score. John St. George, manager of 
the field, fearful of trouble, tried to 
pacify them, but by this time both the 
players and the spectators had taken 
sides. The fight was on! 

Frank Enos, noted news commentator, 
and Robert Tavernelli, announcer, were 
giving a detailed account of the battle 
instead of the game. Enos still made 
hasty pudding of his words, we thought, 
for it was difficult to hear him. We left 
the stadium just as the people invaded 
the press box. What a day! 

We dined at a quiet little restaurant 
where the silence was very welcome 
after the confusion in the ball park. I 
was eating as placidly as a cow when 
Miss Chandler surprised my food down 
my throat by nudging me. 

"Look over there!" she whispered. 

Two girls were standing on the seat 
of their booth, peering into the next one. 
When they turned around, I recognized 
Betty Robbins and Charlotte Adams. 
They were employed in the establish- 
ment as singing waitresses, called the 
Trilling Servers. We being curious, just 
curious, crossed the room to discover 
what was so diverting. 

"Be quiet," the waitresses whispered. 

"Who are those two men?" asked the 
irrepressible Agnes. 

"Lewis Morton, noted explorer, and 
Melquesideque Perry, world - famous 
violinist. We're taking candid shots of 
them. They rarely give interviews, 
temperament, you know — but we are 
going to ask for one just the same." 

After some coaxing Morton gave an 
exciting account of his many adventures, 
while Perry was very agreeable and 



allowed the girls to take many pictures 
of him while he made comical faces. 
His specialty was the lemon maltese 
type, but he also demonstrated the 
method of making one eye watch the 
other when the first was suspicious of 
what the other could see. As we left, 
Mary Souza, librarian, and Dorothy M. 
Peterson, social worker, entered the 
room, and, seeing the crowd around 
Morton and Perry, immediately went 
over to secure their autographs. 

A telegram forwarded from New York 
was brought to us by Pearl Owens, 
owner of the restaurant and the sponsor 
of the Trilling Servers. We were in- 
formed that John Brewer and Richard 
Vaughan had left to explore the Valley 
of the Giants, where they were certain 
that life would be more pleasant. 

Our last stop was at Chicago, where 
we visited the variety store of Gerald 
Albertini and Harold Corvini. In one 
of the show windows, Beatrice West and 
Eugenia Izzo were demonstrating a 
"sure-fire" exercise to reduce excess 
weight! In the group of women I saw 
Charlotte Mcllvana, watching with 
sober face and uninterested eye. She 
was in the wrong department, or at least 
she should have been. 

Leaving the store, we crossed the 
street and entered the theatre. Dorris 
Bliss and Frances Ryan were appearing 
in the cast, and we thought that a good 
play might prove enjoyable! The play 
was entitled, "IF YOU DON'T LIKE IT, 
LEAVE." We left. 

The return trip was made in great 
haste. Once again in New York, we all 
agreed that our experiment had been 
interesting enough but had hardly pro- 
vided the material of which books are 
made. Therefore, I changed my plans 
altogether. 

The following article appeared in the 
"New York Times", on July 9, 1952: 

Novelist changes plans! Leaves to- 
day for home town — Plymouth. 
Massachusetts. Intends to write a 
book on ancient Pilgrim Life . . . 

Gloria Morrelli '40 
Helen Hamilton '40 



The editors wish to thank Mrs. Mar- 
garet Brown for the material prepared 
for The Pilgrim in the Art Department. 



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IN TRIBUTE 

T)URING the past four years the Na- 
tional Society Daughters of the 
American Revolution has sponsored a 
Good Citizenship Pilgrimage among the 
students of the senior classes in public 
high schools throughout the country. 
When the Class of 1940 of Plymouth High 
School chose its best citizen, it voted for 
the girl who possessed these four qual- 
ities of character to an outstanding de- 
gree: dependability, service, leadership, 
and patriotism. 

For the past three years Lois Chand- 
ler has served her class and school in 
many ways. As a sophomore she was 
prominent in sports, playing basketball, 
badminton, and baseball. While a jun- 
ior, she was a member of the Junior 
Press Club and was appointed to the 
staff of the school annual. She was also 
one of the most active entertainers in 
the P. H. S.-Capades. Lois was elected 
to the Massasoit Chapter of the National 
Honor Society, and served on the com- 
mittee for the Junior Promenade. Now, 
as a senior, she has risen to the position 
of Senior Features Editor on The Pil- 
grim. She played a fine comedy role in 
the school play, and served on the Senior 
Dance Committee and the Senior Pic- 
tures Committee. In June she will 
graduate with high scholastic honors. 

Lois is active in the community, for 
she is a junior member of the Plymouth 



Woman's Club and Secretary of the Jun- 
ior Alliance of the Unitarian Church. 
Her dependability and efficiency make 
her a welcome worker in any group, and 
her good sense and good humor have 
won her many friends. 

The Class of 1940 is proud of its best 
girl citizen. 

Dorris Bliss '40 



SCREEN REVIEW OF 1940 

Naughty But Nice— The Class of 40 
Disputed Passage — Corridor between 

Junior and Senior High School 
Each Dawn I Die — No homework done 
Golden Boy — John Brewer 
Our Leading Citizen — Lois Chandler 
Some Like It Hot — Giovanetti's Orches- 
tra 
Stronger Than Desire — The odor from 

the chemistry lab 
They All Came Out— To the "Mad Hat- 
ters" 
They Asked For It — The class colors 
Thunder Afloat— The Football Squad 
Winter Carnival — February Vacation 
Quick Millions — School Banking System 
Youth Takes a Fling — In Brewster's 

beachwagon 
Another Thin Man — Harold Rogers 
Emergency Squad — To move the piano 
The Women — Last period English class- 
Room 301 
Here I Am A Stranger — Honor Society 
Initiation 



28 



THE PILGRIM 



(DMR WAY 

The glacier moves thro' valleys deep, 
By mountains .treacherous and steep; 
Trie river winds its course of old 
Thro'deserts parched and plains grown cold. 
Each follows easily the way 
That God made on Creation Day 
But each one meets some barricade 
Thro' which no trace of path is laid; 
Yet it moves onward toward the sea; 
Each finds its way or makes one. 

And as we live and love and hate, 
Too oft accept our measured fate, 
We fall exhausted at the wall, 
Defeated,weak,and spurn the call 
To stronger life , which is our own 
To reach, at tain, t ho' backward thrown. 
Tfear down this^wall and place each rock 
To form a stairway, block on block, 
lb vanquish fate, success achieve: 
We'll find our way or make one! 

John Brewer +o 




THE PILGRIM 



29 




CHANG 

'THE news circulating through the 

neighborhood that Chang's death had 
been caused by an automobile would 
have made him indignant. For the bet- 
ter part of seven years he had dashed 
across busy thoroughfares, expertly 
weaving his way among the cars with 
never an accident. His death resulted 
from poisoning, and the end was quick 
and painless. 

He had led a carefree life, the pedi- 
greed pet of an adoring household. Ever 
since the first day he had been intro- 
duced into the family, just a soft muff 
of fur with large, brown eyes and every 
bit as wide as he was long, he had been 
loved by the family and neighborhood. 
Harsh words elicited by the sight of 
muddy prints on the clean spread or the 
necessity of a few sharp blows with the 
leash when a piece of meat was mysteri- 
ously missing brought remorse to the 
heart of the punisher as acutely as it 
did to the culprit. 

Everybody knew Chang, for he was no 
ordinary Chow dog. He possessed neither 
an uncertain temper, nor the will to fight 
for which this breed is known. He was 
patient to the extent of allowing little 
children to pull his "curlycue tail", and 
he made many pennies for his little mis- 
tress by obligingly opening his mouth 
to show the astonished youngsters his 
dark blue tongue and gums. He even 
permitted the prodding of the fingers 
of the unbelievers who wanted to make 
sure he hadn't been eating blueberry pie 
or drinking ink. 

He was so happy that, in spite of be- 
ing handicapped by dumbness, he trans- 
mitted some of his joy to us, and the 
sight of the wagging tail and little bronze 
body surging with vitality always 
brought a smile to our lips no matter 
how great our troubles. 

Chang was possessed, naturally 
enough, with a dislike for felines, but 
he would bear the sly tricks of Turkey, 
the family cat, with patient amusement, 
only administering a light cuff with his 
shaggy paw when the cat became too 
lively. 

Everybody misses Chang, and, al- 



though other pets have come and gone, 
none can ever quite take the place he 
holds in our hearts. 

Dorris Bliss '40 



THE THIN MAN 



AS long as the school band played mil- 
itary marches, John Thomas listened 
attentively; but as soon as a speaker 
began extolling the achievements of the 
School Board, other thoughts began to 
creep into his mind, and his eyes strayed 
from the stage, over housetops, and past 
the water tower. Johnnie was thinking 
about fathers, all boys' fathers in gen- 
eral, and his own beloved father in 
particular — yes, about his own dear 
father, Harold Thomas, the kind, under- 
standing fifth-grade teacher, the upright, 
loyal citizen, and the gentle, loving 
parent. What a pity, though, that he 
should have been so very weak, so very 
delicate in constitution! Why couldn't 
God make all fathers big and strong 
with muscles like steel? Why had He 
chosen to make his father a frail man 
with thin, weak arms? 

A shudder swept over the boy. Per- 
haps something the speaker had said had 
penetrated his attention and made him 
again remember the awful horror of that 
day, some three years before, when the 
old school building had quaked on its 
foundation and had almost exploded in 
his face. The classroom floor was quiv- 
ering again! The walls were crashing all 
about him! The girls and boys were 
screaming in terror! His leg actually 
hurt, too, just as it had that day when a 
timber from the ceiling had snapped the 
bone just below his knee! Now, more 
vividly than when it happened, his 
mind's eye saw his father, straining 
frantically with what little strength 
there was in his thin arms, trying des- 
perately to pull shut the fire door that 
would keep the flames in the adjacent 
room from entering the fifth-grade 
classroom. By closing the door, Harold 
Thomas hoped to give his trapped pupils 
a stronger chance of being rescued. 
However, he lacked the strength to pull 
the door shut and became frantic in his 



30 



THE PILGRIM 



efforts as the flames began to leap 
through the doorway. Johnnie had 
begun to cry, not because of fear, nor 
because of the pain that throbbed in his 
leg, but because of his father's frailty. 
Tom's Dad could have pulled that door 
shut; Dick's father could have done it 
with one hand. 

Something the speaker was saying 
brought Johnnie back to the present. 
Today the proud citizenry of Lansing, 
Michigan, was dedicating the new fire- 
proof school building. The stage was 
crowded with fathers, school board offic- 
ials, and honored guests, including the 
mayor, Mr. Jones, who was now saying: 

"The late Harold Thomas was a frail 
man, but he possessed a courage which 
is a far greater possession than physical 
strength. With all the power in him, he 
pulled and tugged to close that fire 
door, but his strength was not enough. 
Thirty of his pupils, including his own 
son, were doomed to a terrible death if 
he didn't succeed. Well, those children 
are alive today, living evidence of how 
courageous, yes, how heroic a man 
Harold Thomas was. When he discov- 
ered he could not pull the door shut, he 
bravely stepped into the adjacent room, 
and, unmindful of the flames, got behind 
the door and pushed it shut." 

John and his mother, who were sitting 
among the honored guests on the stage, 
lowered their heads to hide their tears, 
tears of sorrow and loneliness, but of 
pride, too. Sweet was their memory of 
the beloved husband and father, whose 
name was engraved on the face of the 
new "Harold Thomas School." 

John Nutterville '42 



IF I WERE KING 

Four and twenty blackbirds 
Baked in a pie — 
When the pie was opened, 
The birds began to sing, 
Wasn't that a dainty dish 
To set before a King? 

In nursery rhyme days this blackbird 
pie was evidently considered a dish 
which was fit for a King. Times have 
changed and, if I were King, I should not 
want my chef to serve me a blackbird 
pie. A good meat pie with a filling of 
beef, potatoes, and carrots, the whole 
covered with a thick, flaky crust baked 
until brown, would be much more to my 
taste. 

On state occasions, when I invited 



my ministers to dine, I should regale 
them with thick slices of ham, baked in 
Southern style, surrounded with candied 
sweet and white potatoes. For my very 
special friends I would order a Porter- 
house steak, French fried potatoes, 
asparagus, olives, and sweet gherkins. 

No baked, steamed or boiled puddings 
either hot or cold, no gelatine or jello 
would ever be served in my palace. My 
guests would have a choice of lemon 
pie, with three-inch thick meringue, 
or hot apple pie topped with two scoops 
of vanilla ice cream. 

If my servants ate these meals, they 
would need exercise and would get 
plenty putting away my shoes since I 
usually have three or four pairs strewn 
over my floor. Also the bending exer- 
cises they would get picking up the 
papers littering the floor within a rad- 
ius of two feet from my wastebasket 
where I have thrown — and missed, 
would be very beneficial. 

A royal jeweler would be kept busy 
taking care of my clocks and watches as 
I am continually breaking the clocks and 
losing the watches. 

Which birthday are you celebrating? 
This is a question my family asks each 
year. My birthday is in June, but when 
I was very small, it was decided to have 
my birthday celebrated on February 
14th, as my brother's was February 9th, 
and my sister's February 18th. For years 
I have had two sets of birthday presents, 
but the system isn't working so well as 
it used to. 

Being king would have its advan- 
tages. Sinces the King can do no wrong, 
I could have my birthday celebrated in 
proper style — as often within the year 
as I saw fit. 

Ronald Smith '40 



YOUTH AND THE FUTURE 

TN recent years there has been an in- 
creased desire for a higher education 
by many graduates of our secondary 
schools. Special training for their own 
special job is what youth is seeking. 
Not all, but most of them, have some- 
thing definite in mind, a goal that they 
have set for themselves. They face the 
future with an earnestness that is some- 
times amazing. 

We wonder at this. Surely the jobless 
who walk the streets are no inspiration. 
Then again we wonder where all the jobs 
are to come from if those looking for 
work are to get one. 



THE PILGRIM 



31 



But there is at least one comforting 
thought, for we realize there is a greater 
variety of jobs than there was once, jobs 
that call for skill with hands as well as 
with brains. In fact, if we investigate, 
we are surprised how many new fields 
are today open to energetic youth. Civil 
service, farming, dairying, aviation, 
mechanics and engineering, social and 
health service offer a variety of oppor- 
tunities. 

And youth looks to a field that requires 
training because of this, and also because 
of good salaries which usually reward 
the workers. Even poor finances are not 
such a handicap. There are many 
approved trade schools that offer courses 
at a reasonable cost. Night courses are 
especially helpful to those who are 
obliged to work by day to gain an educa- 
tion. 

All this calls for work, and plenty of 
it, on the part of the student, but, as a 
rule, young people who are interested 
in a particular line are willing to work. 
They have a definite aim in life and look 
hopefully into the future. 

Harley Mitchell '40 



A TRUE SPORTSMAN 

TN one of the editions of "The Saturday 
Evening Post" we saw a very striking 
picture of a hunter paddling down a 
peaceful river in the heart of the Maine 
Woods. It was sundown and he was 
returning to his camp from a day spent 
in the peaceful solitude of the woods. 

A man we know quite well, the owner 
of a grocery store, is a gunner in his 
spare time. He is a fairly stout man of 
about fifty years of age. This friend 
spends allhis spare time in raising hunt- 
ing dogs and in enjoying his camp on the 
beach. He also raises many varieties of 
ducks for the camp. When the duck sea- 
son approaches, he takes his dogs, birds, 
guns, food supply, and other equipment 
to his camp on the beach and spends the 
whole season there. 

His interest in his camp has made it 
one of the most popular in this vicinity, 
for it offers all the things dear to a man 
who enjoys the out-of-doors. If we were 
to stroll past his camp in the evening, we 
should find him sitting in his old rocking 
chair in front of the stove, his dogs 
sleeping at his feet, and he would be 
reading the latest sporting magazine. Or 
if we were to stroll past the camp in 
early morning, we should find him sit- 
ting behind his blind waiting for the 



approach of ducks on the wing. If he 
didn't see one duck for four days, he 
would be satisfied with the simple ex- 
pectation of a better day tomorrow. He 
is never disgruntled at failure. 

The sun sets once more as he returns 
to the old rocking chair in his snug 
cabin, at peace with the world and with 
God. He is our idea of a really true 
sportsman. 

Martin McAuley '41 



ACTIVE OR PASSIVE? 

\|f/HO can truthfully say that clubs and 
activities are not an essential part of 
the school curriculum? We rather think 
that none of us could, provided we gave 
the question intelligent, careful thought, 
for without doubt our future social life 
depends a great deal upon the acquaint- 
ances and associations we make during 
our youth. This being the case, many of 
our school clubs should have much 
larger memberships, and more of us 
should be interested in extra-curricular 
activities. The fact is that some of us, 
too many of us, in fact, are inactive, 
passive, uninterested in fields outside 
the ordinary courses of study. 

Of course, the pupil who finds his 
ordinary work difficult and has no time 
for other interests may be an exception. 
If he finds his work arduous, he should 
persevere until he masters it, avoiding 
too many activities which would divert 
his attention. The majority of pupils, 
however, have enough spare time but 
prefer not to spend it in an organized 
manner. These are the students who 
should join study groups. 

For those who enjoy nature and wood- 
craft there is the 4-H Club; for the scien- 
tifically or mechanically-minded, the 
Radio or Aviation Clubs; for the musi- 
cally inclined, glee clubs, orchestra, and 
band; for the physically active, football 
and basketball; and for all there arc 
various periodic activities sponsored by 
the school itself. 

Although this extra-curricular work 
could have a slightly detrimental effect 
upon the marks of the pupil, its divi- 
dends in fun and experience far out- 
weigh the injuries it might inflict. Mem- 
bers of clubs have opportunities to show 
their skills, to meet and make new 
friends, to develop their natural abilities 
into useful and possibly profitable pas- 
times, and to gain self-confidence and 
poise when in public. 

Walter Corrow '41 



32 



THE PILGRIM 



111 The Crow's Nest 



'THE moment the whole business started 
I thought I had better put it down 
just as it occurred although, at the mo- 
ment, I feel that these words will never 
be read by anyone who matters. 

I would first like to state that I am 
Ralph Harold Benton, aged seventeen, 
and that I am an apprentice aboard the 
cargo steamer "Island Queen." 

If sometimes this account breaks off 
at unexpected places, it is because I have 
to keep a constant look-out for trouble 
below and for any vessel that might ap- 
pear on the horizon. However, at the 
moment everything seems quiet and I'm 
not uncomfort- 
able in the 
crow's nest. 

Nothing at all 
out of the ordi- 
nary has hap- 
pened for sev- 
eral weeks. We 
called at various 
ports, discharg- 
ing cargo at 
some and load- 
ing at others. 
The skipper, 
Captain William 
Haslett, proved 
to be a regular 
fellow and was 
very kind to me. 
The other offi- 
cers weren't par- 
ticularly pleas- 
ant, but I guess 
that was because 
they were worried. 

You see, the crew was pretty tough 
and needed careful handling, especially 
one giant of a man named Joe Jackson 
who looked like an ex-boxer. Anyway, 
I didn't do too badly, and it would have 
been a grand trip but for the fourth 
officer, Bronson. He was dead set 
against me. 

It must have been about twelve hours 
ago that Bronson ordered me to the 
crow's nest. I protested that Captain 
Haslett didn't want me in the nest, but 
it was useless, so up I had to go. It wasn't 
bad at all and I was quite enjoying it, 
particularly as the sea was calm, when 
I happened to look down and very nearly 
swallowed the gum I was chewing. 

It was about three in the afternoon, 
and most of the crew were in their quar- 
ters. As I looked towards the fo'c'sle, I 
saw Joe Jackson and a huge man called 




Mad Harry dodge behind some water 
casks as they made their way towards 
the bridge. 

They both carried revolvers and I 
knew at once that it was a case of mu- 
tiny! My first impulse was to yell, but 
there was nothing to be gained by that, 
and it was just as well that I didn't. If 
I had hollered, I'm sure Joe would have 
shot me. As it was, he halted, bellowed 
some kind of an order, and instantly men 
appeared from nowhere. 

"You'd better lie low, Ralph, my lad!" 
I muttered to myself. Then I sighed with 
relief as I thought of that little Iver 

Johnson revol- 
ver I'd smuggled 
aboard at Pana- 
ma. With that in 
my fist I felt 
quite capable of 
halting the mu- 
tiny myself. 
Hold on a mo- 
ment — 

It's been an 
hour since I ask- 
ed you to hold 
on, and I've had 
a pretty lively 
time. However, 
I'll tell things in 
their proper se- 
quence. The mo- 
ment Joe barked 
that order, nine- 
tenths of the 
crew swarmed 
on deck, and I 
heard a shot that shattered the window 
of the bridge. 

The skipper was roaring like a bull, 
and the first officer must have grabbed a 
revolver because I heard him give Joe 
three seconds to drop his weapon. The 
ex-boxer's answer was another shot, and 
I have an idea that Mr. Marks was hit. 

I expect it was the best organized mu- 
tiny at sea in the annals of history. The 
skipper and the other officers were 
quickly overpowered and must have 
been locked below somewhere because 
I haven't seen or heard of them since. 

During the night Joe Jackson remem- 
bered me, and in the light of the full 
moon I saw him standing forward and 
heard him bellowing to me to come 
down. 

"Are you with us?" he roared. "If so, 
you can come down and turn in. What's 



THE PILGRIM 



33 



it to be? You'll have your share at the 
end of the trip." 

I thought for a second. Then I kept 
my head down and yelled, "I take my 
orders from Captain Haslett. You know 
what you can do, don't you?" 

I saw him lift his revolver and take 
aim, but I fired first. It was a lucky shot. 
The deck was splintered three feet be- 
yond where Joe was standing and he 
vanished like a shadow. After that Mad 
Harry shouted that he would get me, but 
I yelled back that I'd shoot the first man 
that tried. 

The engines were started again and 
Joe altered course for Seagull Island, I 
think. Nothing happened for a while 
and then Nigger Jim, a tough Trinidad 
boy, nearly caught me on the jump. It 
wasn't until he stubbed his toe and 
grunted that I realized he was climbing 
up to the nest. I threatened to blow his 
head off, and he went back. 

After that I managed to snatch a half- 
hour of shut-eye, but it didn't do me 
much good. I was awakened when Joe 
had his men open fire at me from all 
over the ship. The bullets dented this 
steel crow's nest badly, and one nearly 
came through. 

Anyway I returned the fire, and finally 
Joe yelled that he would have me strung 
up by the thumbs when he laid hands on 
me. Well, there will be no sleep for me 
now, and my eyes are aching terribly! 

Dawn was breaking in the east, a 
beautiful sight. I wondered where Bron- 
son was. I bet he was in on this. Funny 
chap, not like a sailor at all. Probably 
he'd be the one to handle the business 
end of this piracy. 

It was quite light now and, as I kept 
my eyes skinned, I saw a man crawl out 
of one of the empty water casks. It was 
Bronson! I almost yelled a warning to 
Joe as Bronson crouched down behind 
a tank, but I'm glad I didn't; or should 
I be glad? I don't know yet. 

Joe Jackson threw up his hands as 
Bronson stepped out and stuck a gun in 
his ribs. 

"Alter course!" said the fourth officer. 
"Then give orders for the captain to be 
released. Hurry, now! I've no time to 
waste." 

Good boy, Bronson! But just then Mad 
Harry must have seen from the bridge 
what was going on, and he took a shot 
at Bronson. He missed, and Bronson 
yelled, "One more like that and I'll shoot 
your precious leader!" 

The reply stunned me. "Shoot away!" 
cried Mad" Harry. "We've got a new 



leader and I'm him. Shoot away, Mister 
Bronson, shoot away." 

Suddenly Joe jumped sideways and 
in a second there was a rough scramble 
on the deck. Poor Bronson, he was no 
match for a dozen of our crew and soon 
he was securely tied to a ventilator. 
Hold on a while. I've spotted smoke on 
the horizon! Looks like a cruiser! 

I'm now in my quarters after a fifteen- 
hour stretch of sleep and the best meal 
Billy could dish up. 

When I said I spotted smoke on the 
horizon, I was not mistaken. Within a 
few minutes I saw a cruiser about four 
miles away. She was coming very fast 
but not towards us. I was afraid that 
she'd pass to the east of us and I tried 
hard to think of a way to attract her 
attention. 

It came at last. I owned a big watch 
which had belonged to my grandfather, 
so I got it out of my jacket pocket, open- 
ed the back, and did what I could to 
convert it into a heliograph. At first 1 
felt that I was just wasting time, but 
suddenly I saw the cruiser change course 
and an answering signal came from her 
bridge. Crash! A bullet hit the side of 
the crow's nest. It was followed by 
others. Joe had seen what I was up to 
and roared that he would get me if he 
had to tear down the mast. Then he had 
a better idea. I saw him go up to Bron- 
son and put a revolver up to the fourth's 
head. 

Boom! The cruiser must have read 
my urgent message because she made 
no joke about firing a shot across our 
bow. Joe and Harry knew that they 
were finished so they cut Bronson loose 
and surrendered him long before the 
cruiser reached the side of the "Island 
Queen." 

I'm afraid they had to carry me down 
from the nest, and, when I awoke, I was 
amazed to learn that Mr. Bronson had 
sent me up to the crow's nest on purpose. 
He had sensed the trouble and thought 
I would be safer up there. He's a regular 
fellow even if he is rather on the strict 
side. 

I guess that's about all. We're back on 
our original course, and I'll be glad to 
see Sydney Harbor again. It's been ex- 
citing, too exciting. 

George Cavicchi '40 



SORE SPOTS IN AMERICAN LIFE 

^ERE are some challenging facts on 
the Sore Spots of America learned 
from the study of the Problems of De- 
mocracy. 



34 



THE PILGRIM 



Item No. 1 
An unbiased observer, seeking a birds- 
eye view of the way in which the great 
wealth and income of America are 
divided, would find in 1926, a pre- 
depression year, the following facts: 

1% of population owned 33% of wealth 
10% of population owned 64% of wealth 
Poorest 25% owned 3y 2 % of wealth 

1% of population received 2% of income 
10% of population received 40% of income 
Poorest 25% of population received 3V 2 % 
of income 

Concentration of wealth in the hands 
of a few and curtailment of the pur- 
chasing power of the many result in 
numerous and complicated problems. 
Such conditions tend to feed dissatis- 
faction and breed crime. Results: pov- 
erty in the midst of plenty. 

Item No. 2 

Aftpr six years of the deepest ?" r! 
most baffling economic depression yet 
known, we find approximately 1 '5 of 
our man power and 1/6 of our popula- 
tion idle. 

The United States Department of 
Commerce estimates that the depression 
cost business and industry alone 
$26,000,000,000. 

In 1936 alone, 2178 strikes occurred, 
involving nearly a million people. 

Item No. 3 

Hundreds of thousands of people roam 
the country, homeless and discouraged, 
many of them desperate. It is a young 
population; 35% under 45 years; 42 r < 
under 25 years; and 20% under 20 years. 
Some 60% are unattached individuals, 
and 40% are in families. 14% of family 
heads are women. Women and girls 
form 51 r 'f of all persons in itinerant 
families, but comprise but 2% of the 
unattached, and 21%. of all the tran- 
sients. 

Item No. 4 

During the year 1933 the arrest rec- 
ords of 241,000 persons were studied. 
The largest of all the age groups were 
those of 19 years of age. This youthful 
group numbered 13,418 individuals, 
charged with larceny, burglary, robbery, 
assault, rape, and criminal homicide. 
Seventeen hundred were 14 years of age 
or younger, 20% were under 21, and 3 
out of 5 were under 30. These figures 
are for the entire nation. In New York 
the percentage of youthful criminals was 
even greater. At Sing Sing, 50% were 
under 20 years and 80% were under 30 
years of age. 

Clarence Darrow said, "There is one 



general cure for crime or the prevention 
of it. Get rid of poverty." 
Item No. 5 

The per capita consumption of alco- 
holic beverages is startling. Whereas in 
1850 the per capita consumption of alco- 
holic beverages in this country was 4.03 
gallons a year, it rose in 1918 to 22.80 
gallons a year. Since the repeal of 
Prohibition it does not appear to have 
been reduced. 

The total result of this and other types 
of intemperance is difficult, if not im- 
possible, to measure. The people of the 
United States spend almost five billion 
dollars a year fcr alcoholic beverages. 
Item No. 6 

The sanctity, and even the contin- 
uance, of the home, the most basic of 
all human institutions, is questioned. 
T'eh'able statistics show that one out of 
every six marriages ends in the divorce 
court. Ten independent studies show 
that 40.1 ' V of delinquent boys and girls 
come from broken homes. 

The Problems of Democracy, an elec- 
tive half-year course, has opened our 
eyes to some grim facts about our coun- 
try and has made us think. 

Alfred Sitta '40 



OLD IRONSIDES 



Packards may come and Packards may go. 
But there'll always be Fords as you prob- 
ably know — 
Fords that are old. and Fords that are new. 
They still burn up oil and still make you 
blue. 

I have an old Ford I never can trust. 

It's faded in color and groaning with rust; 

Whether I beat it or tear it apart. 

I am utterly helpless: it simply won't start. 

I crank it and push it to little avail. 
Pray what is the matter? Pray why do you 
fail? 
Your oil is all right, your fuel's not low. 

Come on, now! brace up. and away we can 
go! 

So you're going to be stubborn? I'll show you. 
by thunder. 
I'll master you yet though you rend me 
asunder. 
So it's heigh diddle dee. no riding today. 
But hark. — there's a sound, heigh ho. we're 
away! 

With a roaring of motor and clashing of gear. 

I'm off to my doom I most solemnly fear. 
Fences and stumps beneath us are mowed. 

My steed charges on, unmindful of road. 

We race for the river, we stop with a thud. 

My car's in a heap now. and I'm in the mud: 
From that antique model I've had my last 

thrill. 
As for its remains, they're in the mud still. 

Alvin Guidaboni '41 



THE PILGRIM 



35 







36 



THE PILGRIM 



s Fair Pete 



pETE trudged wearily along Rainbow 
Avenue pushing his empty chair. He 
had just left a young couple in the Home 
Furnishings Building. Looking at his 
watch, he found he had only three- 
quarters of an hour more to work. Ac- 
cording to the rules of the Express Com- 
pany he must keep his chair moving, so 
he decided to return slowly to the Base 
by unfrequented lanes. He didn't want 
any more passengers because tonight he 
had a date with the redhead who was 
demonstrating 
fountain pens in 
the Communica- 
tions Building. 

As he strolled 
along, he thought 
of the tips he 
had received. 
Two girls who 
wanted to get 
into General Mo- 
tors with the 
first group had 
given him fifty 
cents. The tired 
business man 
who had to catch 
the 3:10 train 
had given him a 



we'd better hire him, Emma," the other 
one answered, "no matter what it costs." 
"Where do you want to go?" Pete 
asked. 

"Take us up to the Lagoon of Nations. 
We haven't seen any of the Foreign 
buildings yet." 

They squeezed into the chair and Pete 
groaned to himself, "Whew, I bet they 
weigh three hundred apiece. I hope I 
can get rid of them in half an hour." 
Coming again to Rainbow Avenue, he 
began his, "We 
are now crossing 
Rainbow Avenue. 
The French build- 
ing is on the left 
and the Belgian 
building on the 
right." Glancing 
at his watch, he 
thought, "Fifteen 




dollar for get- 
ting him to the 

Long Island Station on time. With the 
two dollars which the intoxicated man 
had given him and several quarter tips 
he had done better than usual today. 

These pleasant thoughts were rudely 
interrupted by a loud shout of, "Hey, 
boy!" He turned around and saw two 
fat ladies coming toward him. His heart 
sank. He hoped they only wanted to 
ask a question, but from the way they 
limped he feared the worst. However, 
he stopped and said, "Yes, madam." 

The fatter one asked, "How much do 
you charge for your chair?" 

"A dollar and a half an hour," he said 
aloud, while he thought, "It's too much, 
I hope. I hope. I hope!" 

"Don't you think that's exorbitant, 
Mary?" she asked. 

"Yes, but our feet are so tired I think 



minutes to go." He 
continued, "Straight 
ahead is the Italian Building." 

"Is that a statue of Mussolini on top?" 
asked Emma. 

"Of course it is," answered Mary. 

"Pardon me, ladies," Pete interrupted, 
"but that is supposed to be a statue of 
the Goddess Roma. In one room of this 
building are pictures showing the pro- 
cesses of making cloth from skimmed 
milk." 

"What will those Italians do next? 
What do you suppose would happen to 
a skimmed-milk dress if you were out in 
a rainstorm?" 

"They are demonstrating dresses made 
from it. Would you like to go in and see 
them?" urged Pete. 

"No," Mary answered, "I don't care 
much about what those foreigners make, 
anyways." 



THE PILGRIM 



37 



"Do you notice how large all these 
foreign buildings are? I bet they cost 
plenty. If they can do that, wouldn't 
you think they could pay some of the 
money they owe us?" demanded Emma. 

"Ten more minutes," thought Pete. 
"I've got to get rid of them in a hurry 
somehow." 

"The next building is the British Pa- 
vilion. Perhaps the most interesting 
thing there is the Crown Jewels exhibit," 
continued Pete. 

"The real Crown Jewels?" Mary in- 
quired. 

"No, they are replicas but are very 
valuable," Pete said. 

"Speaking of jewels, Mary, did Helen 
show 3 r ou her engagement ring?" asked 
Emma. 

"Yes, I guess every one has," replied 
Mary. 

"Another failure," Pete thought. "No 
enthusiasm. There must be something 
that will interest them. I have it! — fat 
ladies — food! I'll go around the building 
to the restaurant." 

"On the Terrace to your left is the 
famous English tea garden. It is said 
that they serve wonderful food there and 
the prices are very reasonable." 

"Aren't you hungry, Emma? All this 
sightseeing gives me an appetite. We've 
seen most of the Fair so let us have our 
tea. Stop right here, boy. How much 
do we owe you?" 

Pete made a rapid calculation. "One 
dollar and fifteen cents." 

Mary fumbled in her pocketbook. "I 
have a dollar — have you fifteen cents, 
Emma?" 

"No, but I have a quarter. We can 
give him the ten cents," Emma replied. 

"I made it! Three minutes to spare. 
Redhead, here I come!" 

Ronald Smith '40 



DOUBLES 



It must be fun to be a twin; 
I wish I'd been born as two — 
If I but had a stand-in, 
I know just what we'd do. 

We'd wear our clothes exactly alike 
So that no one could tell us apart, 
To look as like as two spokes of a bike, 
And that's how the mischief would start. 

We'd do each other's make-up tests, 
Exchange when we got in a jam. 
Trick everyone with our merry jests; 
We'd be twice the imp that I am. 

Although I think that twins are fun. 
To you it's plain to see 
It's lucky there is only one, 
Not two of impish me. 

Helen Hamilton '40 



ON THE TRAIL OF THE 
LOST ACUSHNET 

U J'VE found it, I've found it," shouted 
Head. "I've found the long lost 
Acushnet, but shucks! What's the use? 
I'm lost." 

Yes, it was Head, the great detective, 
the persons who could find anything and 
everything that was lost in the woods. 
But even in this predicament he was far 
from defeated, for he had read hundreds 
of detective books and had bought a 
magnifying glass from one of the richest 
men in the world, F. W. Woolworth. 

"Why, even if I am only twelve years 
old, I'll still show up the rest of the older 
dicks," he thought. 

Why, hadn't even Mr. Fairway, the 
rich Mr. Fairway, come to him after all 
others had failed to find the Acushnet? 
And hadn't he found it? 

"Yeh, I found it, but how am I going 
to get out of here?" he wondered as he 
sat astride the limb of a tall tree. He 
looked for an opening and could find 
none. He looked for some landmark but 
could find none. 

"But chee," he whimpered silently, 
"there must be some way out. It's get- 
ting dark and I don't want to stay in 
the woods when it's dark." 

"Well, son, get out of this tree," he 
whispered to himself, "and start walk- 
ing around until you find your way out." 

This he did and an hour later he found 
that he was right back where he had 
started from, but he remembered the 
old saying, "If at first you don't succeed, 
try, try again." So off into the dark 
woods he tramped. 

"I'm sc-sceered," sobbed the brave de- 
tective. 

Then it happened. Something 
grabbed him about the neck! 

"Let go, let go," he shouted. He 
grabbed at the thing which was clutch- 
ing at him. It was only a vine, "Haw, 
chee," he muttered, "I knew it all the 
time." 

He walked on, then stopped in abject 
fear. "Ouch, don't stab me again, please 
don't." To his humiliation he found him- 
self in a briar patch. 

He marched onward determined to 
find his way out. Suddenly he came 
upon the water pump, the old water 
pump on the property of the man he 
worked for, where daily he got his 
drinking water. Now he knew his way 
home. 

He clutched the valuable Acushnet in 
his hand and ran madly for Main Street. 



38 



THE PILGRIM 



Here he waited for a bus which took 
him five miles to his home. 

The minute he stepped into the house, 
his mother grabbed him by the collar 
and demanded an explanation as to 
where he had been. 

"Well, y-you see, ma," he stuttered, 
"I was walking in the woods and got so 
tired I lay down. Before I knew it I 
was asleep." 

"You're sure you're telling the truth?" 
his mother inquired. 

"Yes, ma," he lied. 

"Well, eat something and hop into 
bed," his mother said with a sigh. 

When he got to his room, he un- 
wrapped the Acushnet from his hand- 
kerchief which he had tucked snugly 
into his pocket before entering the house. 
He walked under the light with it and 
examined it carefully. It was so per- 
fectly round and so shiny. Tomorrow he 
would return it to Mr. Fairway and get 
his reward. He put it under his pillow, 
put out the light, and went to sleep. 

He arose early the next morning, ate 
his breakfast, then thumbed his way to 
the Plymouth Country Club. 

It was not long before Mr. Fairway 
rolled up in his new 1939 Rolls-Royce. 
His chauffeur opened the door with a 
flourish and out stepped a man of about 
eighty who, when he saw Head, walked 
toward him. 

"Have you found my Acushnet?" he 
wheezed. 

"Yes, I have," retorted Head. "Here it 
is. It is still in wonderful condition." 

"Thank you very much. Here is your 
reward," Mr. Fairway answered drop- 
ping a coin into Head's hand. 

"Oh, thank you," Head murmured. 

Then, "Of all the cheap skates," mum- 
bled Head as he walked away. "Only a 
thin dime for a practically new golf 
ball." Frederick Wirzburger '41 



GO RIGHT ON WORKING 

Ah, yes! the task is hard, 'tis true, 

But what's the use of sighing? 
They're soonest with their duties through 

Who bravely keep on trying. 
There's no advantage to be found 

In sorrowing or shirking; 
They with success are soonest crown'd 

Who just go right on working. 

Strive patiently and with a will j 

That shall not be defeated; 
Keep singing at your task until 

You see it stand completed. 
Nor let the clouds of doubt draw near 

Your sky's glad sunshine murking; 
Be brave and fill your heart with cheer 

And just go right on working. 

Harris Frim '40 



WHAT'S YOUR SCORE? 

WE girls, commonly regarded as the 
weaker sex, admit we like you boys. 
When good Mother Nature stimulates 
the old B. U. in us, we just can't restrain 
ourselves. However, for very special 
reasons we like some of you better than 
others. 

The qualifications of a smooth and 
handsome movie idol aren't essential. 
You can be plump and good-natured, or 
as thin as the "before" in an Ovaltine 
advertisement. Whether you're gangly 
and awkward, broad and muscular, or 
slight and limber, it's what is beneath 
the surface that ticks with us. We do 
mean you must have personality, but 
big ears and buck teeth can be its ac- 
companiment. Mortimer Snerd gets 
along all right. 

We require that you be neat, appro- 
priately dressed and scrubbed, with 
your hair slick, teeth shiny, and shoes 
polished. We prefer that you err on the 
side of conservativeness, for we loathe 
ties which betray jazzy tastes. We fail 
to admire grimy nails and sandpapery 
chins. 

If you wish a date, you can ask directly 
without hemming and hawing and hint- 
ing. "What are you doing tonight?" puts 
us on the defensive. Although it's none 
of your business anyway, whatever you 
have to suggest may change our minds 
about our evening schedule. You could 
make certain your bid is entered early 
enough for us to get ready in a leisurely 
fashion, but not so early that we never 
enjoy the prospect of choosing another. 

When you do date us, we'd appreciate 
having the evening planned ahead of 
time. Our entertainment could vary 
according to the fluctuations of your 
budget, because it isn't what you spend. 
— it's the way that you spend it that is 
important. If you're broke, you might 
tell us in order that we won't wonder 
why you didn't ask us out that night we 
saved exclusively for you. Being that 
way about you, an evening at home, a 
walk, or a picnic would be as enjoyable 
as the most sophisticated dinner or 
dance. 

You don't need to be too shy with us. 
You won't get hurt or snubbed unless 
you deserve it. Naturally, you rate zero 
if you stand us up, confuse your dates 
and days, or come around only when 
you know we're at home all alone. In 
the last case, ninety-nine times out of a 
hundred we'll be catching up on our 
beauty treatments. 

Continued on Page 40 



THE PILGRIM 



39 



e 



SUMMER'S FAREWELL 

Gold and red on tree and bush, 

A clear, bright sky of blue; 

Miss Autumn briskly takes her place. 

And Summer's reign is through. 

Sweet Summer gathers round her 

Her robe's green velvet hue, 

She steps into the twilight hush — 

Prepares to say adieu. 

She softly whispers her farewell, 

Then she's scarcely gone, when 

Back again she comes to us, 

Like a spirit old, reborn. 

She returns as Indian Summer 

With seductive loveliness, 

We revel in the beauty 

Of her sweet and last caress. 

Martha Lemius 



WINTER'S ACHES 

I must away to the pond again 
To skate in a biting breeze; 

And all I ask is a hockey stick 
To strengthen my shaking knees. 

To glide along on wings of song 

Is now my heart's desire, 
But when they see my battered bones, 

"Still trying?" friends inquire. 

Each night I homeward wend my way, 
My ankles racked with pain — 

Each afternoon I'm off once more 
To try my luck again. 

But soon the season will be past, 
My aches gone with the ice; 

And I'll be called by some new urge 
To once more pay the price. 

Dorothy Morton 



WINTER'S PRICE 

The bathing beach is empty now, 

No seaside life we see: 

The ducks have gone their southward way, 

The waves beat angrily. 

Now the boats have left their moorings, 
Pulled high upon the shore — 
The sea gulls' mournful cries resound, 
Their search of food in store. 

The sky o'erlooks the barren bay 
Of graying blocks of ice: 
The dying sun spreads glories round 
To challenge Winter's price. 

Marylew Haire 



TREASURE CHESTS 

Dusty, worn, and put away 
Are many books of yesterday, 
Pages torn, covers bent, 
Tributes to a life well spent. 

From bookshelves to the reader's hands 
Are carried tales from many lands, 
Of peace and war and treasures old, 
Of mystery and search for gold. 

And so like books if only we 
Could throughout life as helpful be, 
When we are facing sunset's glow, 
A better life we, too, would know. 

Helen Whiting 



DEEP PURPLE 

The sunset in the western skies 
Brings pleasure to our wond'ring eyes; 
And all around on garden walls 
The glory of the purple falls. 

It bathes the trees in streams of light, 
Foretells the coming of the night; 
It slowly streaks across the sky 
And faintly dims the hills on high. 

Across the lake, now calm and blue, 
The purple casts a lovely hue; 
All actions of the daytime cease, 
And all the world prepares for peace. 

Joan Gardner 



40 



THE PILGRIM 



Continued from Page 38 

We ask that you show some sense of 
responsibility. We'd like you to ring the 
doorbell, and meet our parents properly. 
We don't want trouble with them so that 
they will forbid us to go out. If you're 
delayed, it's only fitting to call us up to 
explain. You're worth waiting for as 
long as we understand what it's all 
about. 

We hope that your ego doesn't over- 
power the real you. You, your interests, 
your other girl friends, and your past 
sometimes bore us. How about inducing 
us to talk about ourselves and nattering 
us for a change? You'll win our hearts 
at the outset; that is, unless we swoon 
with amazement. 

We lap up compliments and we adore 
flowers. An occasional corsage would 
render us giddy with enthusiasm and 
commendation for you. You shouldn't 
criticize our hats, but might appreciate 
a new dress, a becoming hair-do, or an 
enticing perfume. 

Show-offs, stuffed shirts, and stick-in- 
the-muds are obviously droons. We no- 
tice you without your futile and stupid 
efforts to attract attention. You can't 
break in on parties you weren't invited 
to and expect a royal welcome. 

We wish you wouldn't try us out on 
the first date. For a while, we should be 
kept in suspense concerning our effect 
on you. In the movies, don't hold our 
hand. We don't believe in leading our 
private lives in public. 

Politeness should be a habit; in fact, 
you could even display a bit of gallantry. 
We're not helpless, but we do dote on 
being made to feel as if we were precious. 

Therefore, woman hater, roughneck, 
brightie, shy guy, fast one, smoothie, pal, 
or rough diamond, we'll choose our type 
and love you for as long as you have 
what it takes. 

Helen Hamilton '40 



THE STORY BEHIND IT 

JN 1934 my uncle, Everett Whiting, died 
much to my sorrow. In his will he 
left me a beautiful as well as a valuable 
stamp collection. In this collection is 
one stamp which has a very interesting 
story behind it. 

My uncle had a shop where he sold 
everything and bought anything. One 
day an old lady came to this shop to 
sell my uncle a very queer dagger of 
Oriental design. Although my uncle 
wished to buy the knife, the old lady 



wanted a great deal of money for it, so 
he told her that he would think the 
matter over, and let her know his decis- 
ion. He later bought the dagger. 

Of course it was displayed for sale in 
the little shop window. However, the 
few who wanted to purchase it were 
not willing to pay the price, so it finally 
found its way to my uncle's desk where 
it was used as a paper cutter. 

One day in his eagerness to open a 
letter which he had been waiting for, 
my uncle dropped the knife to the floor 
and broke off the handle. Picking it up, 
and examining it carefully, he discovered 
the handle to be hollow. In the cavity 
was a very queer stamp. He immed- 
iately took both the knife and stamp to 
a friend who was a philatelist. Much to 
his surprise he learned that the knife 
and stamp had belonged to a Chinese 
emperor who had received the stamp on 
a very important message, through 
which the emperor had acquired much- 
needed land for his people. The emperor 
regarded the stamp as a good luck omen 
and had it placed in a golden box with 
a glass lid so that his people might set 
and worship it. 

On his death bed, the emperor's last 
request was that the stamp be sent to 
his daughter many miles away. The 
stamp was placed in the handle of a 
dagger and was given to a secret mes- 
senger who was to deliver it. From 
this point the history of the knife is not 
known. How it got to the United States 
and how it fell into the possession of the 
old woman, are questions that may 
never be answered. But I do know that 
my father has both knife and stamp put 
safely away. 

Bradford Smith '40 



NOSIREE, BOYS 



TfTELL, the war is beginning to affect 
us. In regard to propaganda, we 
mean. If we believed all we see and 
hear, we'd have to conclude that the 
years between 1914 and 1929 were the 
Golden Age. During those years there 
was a war and the aftermath of war. Be- 
cause of our age we missed the emotional 
experiences which war brings. No doubt 
they'd like to have us enjoy all these 
lovely experiences which they, who. of 
course, were more fortunate than we, 
were privileged to live through. 

For one or two reasons, however, we 

cannot get excited. In the first place, we 

don't care whether we missed those days 

Continued on Page 46 



THE PILGRIM 



41 




I SING BEHIND THE PLOW 

I sing behind the plow, 

Aye, lustily and gay, 
My burdens loosen from my back 

And seem to melt away. 

I sing behind the plow, 

The soil on which I stand, 
A lark, a cloud, a budding leaf 

Are wonders by His hand. 

I sing behind the plow, 

My treasures are but few, 
My gems — the land, the sky, the sea 

Free for all to view. 

My emerald is the dew-swept grass, 
My ruby is the dawn's first ray, 

My pearl, the snow-capped mountain peak; 
My gold is but the sun-drenched hay. 

I sing behind the plow, 

I labor hard and long: 
Yes, when my cares become too great, 

I raise my voice in song. 

Dorris Bliss '40 



THE LITTLE THINGS 

I never knew such little things 

Could ease the pain that living brings, 

Until one night with dreary eyes 

I sat and looked at jeweled skies. 

The stars that twinkled far away 

Brought memories of departed day. 

And the coolness of that sparkling night 

Soon eased my pain and calmed my fright. 

So when I turned again to see 

The worries that had troubled me, 

I found that as the stars had chased 

The woeful day, they had erased 

My sorrow, and the many things 

That are the pain that living brings. 

Lillian Coggeshall '40 




42 



THE PILGRIM 



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THE PILGRIM 



43 



Sophomore Poetry Page 



GEOMETRY! 

Geometry is such a bore, 
Enough's enough — I want no more! 
On lines and angles how I strive, 
Mighty strange I still survive! 
Endless arcs and circles creep 
Through my mind when I'm asleep- 
T&arely do I comprehend, 
Yet — / hope to reach the end. 

Joan Holmes 



TO A BLUE JAY 

I know you're not a nice bird 
And in melody you fail, 
Your squawk is often terrible, 
But, oh — 
That tail! 

I know your disposition is 
Unfortunately rough, 
Your head is held too proudly, 
But, oh — 
That tuft! 

I see the saucy challenge 
In your little beady eye, 
And I know I shouldn't like you 
But — that collar 
And necktie! 

I love you, naughty blue jay, 
Though not all you do — 
Your ways might well be mended 
But, oh — 

That heavenly blue! 

Arleen Linton 



ROADS OF LIFE 

At the crossroad of Life I am standing 
Where many paths beckon to me, 
They draw me to worlds of adventure, 
To worlds that I never may see. 

This road may lead me to freedom, 
This road may lead me to jail; 
And this may take my footsteps down 
The road of those who fail. 

Another may lead to glory 

That later spells defeat; 

Or I'll struggle down a tiresome road 

With slow and wearied feet. 

One road leads up to a mountain 
Where sins and wrongs are confessed: 
It goes to the peak of Contentment, 
'Tis the pathway that leads to Success. 

Connie Murray 



MY WISH 

In winter when the ground is white 
The world is a majestic sight, 

The sun's rays gleam on crystal snow, 
The silvery trees are all aglow. 

The woodpile is a monster drift, 
And fluffy snow is Nature's gift — 

While colder still the crisp air blows, 
And deeper still the snowdrift grows. 

The roadway's blocked, the stonewall 
lost, 
All windows shine with sparkling 
frost — 
O charming season of the year, 
I wish that you were always here! 

Doris Rogan 



SONG OF THE LUTE 

Gently strumming — 
Sweetly humming — 

The lute may play a merry tune. 
So7igs of peace — 
Songs of love — 

The lute, beneath a silv'ry moon. 

Quickly plucked — 
Harshly struck — 

The lute may play a ghastly tune. 
Songs of war — 
Soiigs of death — 

The lute, beneath a waning moon. 

Marie Martinelli 



NIGHT 

The night — a sea of darkness 

Filled with a million glittering beacons 
And ships that drift to unknown ports. 

The night — a velvet mantle 

Decked with a thousa?id twinkling diamonds 
And one bright moonstone at the throat. 

The night — an ageless wonder, 

Deep and mysterious like the ocean, 
Yet soft in blackness like a cloak. 

Jeanette Franks 



46 



THE PILGRIM 



CROSSWORD PUZZLE 




Across 

1. Italian God 

4. Wife of Amphion 

5. A Muse 

7. A sea nymph 

10. Morning — dawn 

11. Ablative plu. end- 
ing 

12. Conjunction 

14. Lowest (ace.) 

15. Home 

16. Sword 



Down 

1. Goddess 

2. Greek of Trojan 
War 

5. Home of Sibyl 
3. Pigs 
6. Fire 

8. Youth (ace.) 

9. Bone (gen.) 

13. Phrygian moun- 
tain (gen.) 

14. Lowest (nom.) 



Continued from Page 40 
or not. We've had a rather happy life 
ourselves, as far as we've gone, and we 
realize that the depression is a good idea 
of what results from such an era. 

Secondly, we like the age we live in 
now, except for the fact that money is 
scarce (and it won't be more plentiful 
after a war), and we'd like to have this 
age continue. 

Then we like living pretty much, and 
want to keep on living rather than to go 
to certain death for the sake of uncer- 
tainties. 

And so, Mr. Chamberlain, M. Daladier, 
Herr Hitler, and Signor Mussolini (not 
to forget Joe Stalin) , we think we'll stay 
here and tend to our knitting. Goodbye, 
and we hope you come out of it better 
than we think you will. 

Lewis Morton '40 



LATIN CLUB 

Teacher Sponsor 
Miss Margie Wilber 

Founded: 1938 34 members 

President George Moskos 

Vice-President . Lewis Morton 

Secretary Lydia Mongan 

Treasurer Barbara Viets 

This club meets once a month for both 
educational and social purposes either at 
school or at the home of a member. The 
December meeting took the form of a 
Christmas party, and the group played 
Latin games. 




LATIN CLUB OFFICERS 

(Reading left to right) 

First Row: Lydia Mongan, Miss Wilber. Barbara Viets 

Second Row: George Moskos, Lewis Morton 



THE PILGRIM 



47 



Now it can be told! The agents of the 
B. F. A. (Bureau for Finding Alumni) , 
having conducted a diligent search for 
some months, have the following report 
to make: 77 alumni located, Classes of 
'37, '38, and '39 — regret to announce sev- 
eral among the missing. It is possible 
that some are deliberately concealing 
their whereabouts or are ignorant of our 
very real interest in them. Those who 
have been found to date are listed below. 

1939 
Constance Addyman — Puritan Mills 
Madeline Baker — Bridgewater State 
Teachers' College. Vice-President of 
the Class of 1943 
Brooks Barnes — Sweet Briar College 
Parker Barnes — Hotchkiss School 
Joan Beever — Goddard College 
Edward Bibeau — Shell Gasoline Station 
Frances Brown — Katherine Gibbs Sec- 
retarial School 
John Canducci — Bentley School of Ac- 
counting 
Janie Christie — Deaconess Hospital 

Training School 
Betty Coleman — Rhode Island School of 

Design 
Joseph Farina — Springfield College 
David Furtado — Higgins Preparatory 

School 
Shirley Goldsmith— Bridgewater State 

Teachers' College 
William Goodwin — Brown and Sharp 

Manufacturing Co. . 
Jane Holmes— Katherine Gibbs Secre- 
tarial School 
Mary Kelly— Mabbett's Office 
Bichard Lanman — Purdue University 
Catherine Leonardi — Nasson College 
Emily McEwen— Pembroke College 
Nahum Morse — Cranberry Business 
Walter Motta— United States Navy 
Ita Murphy— Rhode Island Hospital 
Claire Ottino— Puritan Clothing Com- 
pany. 
Maralyn Pascoe— Katherine Dell School 
Robert Pratt— Burdett College 
Robert Raymond— Boston University 
Richard Silva— New England Conserva- 
tory of Music 
George Stefani— Plymouth Electric 

Light Company 
Virginia Weston — University of Texas 
Gerald Ziegengeist— Boston College 

1938 
Elizabeth Anderson— Puritan Mills Of- 
fice 
Helen Belcher— Mount Holyoke College 



Spencer Brewster — Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology 
Peter Brigida — Smith's News Store 
Janet Broadbent — North Adams State 

Teachers' College 
Mary Cingolani — Bridgewater State 

Teachers' College 
Wilfred Cohen — Springfield College 
Margaret Cook — Rhode Island Hospital 
John Darsch — Keller's Bakery 
Amedeo Galvani — Annapolis Naval 

Academy 
Carol Handy — Bates College 
Roland Holmes — Bowdoin College 
Francis Kritzmacher — Tufts College 
Thomas Metcalf — Bryant College 
Chester Parsons — Northeastern Univer- 
sity 
Barbara Peterson — University of New 

Hampshire 
Janet Perrault — Smith's News Store 
Warren Peck — University of Alabama 
Mario Regini — Bridgewater State Teach- 
ers' College 
Alice Riley — St. Elizabeth's Hospital 

Anna Riley Insurance Office, Boston 

Leo Roberge — Puritan Mills Office 
Francis Scheid — Boston University 
Anna Stein — Boston University 
Betty Studley — Buttner's Store 
John Tavernelli — Boston University 
William Tedeschi — Boston University 
Arnold Torrence — Bridgewater State 

Teachers' College 
Dorothy Ziegengeist — St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital 

1937 
Stanley Addyman — Puritan Mills 
Howard Anderson — F i t c h b u r g State 

Teachers' College 
Barbara Armstrong — Buttner's Store 
Mary Bodell — Radcliffe College 
Blanche Eorghi — Electric Light Office 
Joseph Brewer — Colgate College 
LeBaron Briggs — Harvard College 
Mary Brigida — Bridgewater State 

Teachers' College 
Janet Clark — Buttner's Store 
Phyllis Johnson — Bridgewater State 

Teachers' College 
Edgar Lee— Plymouth Baking Company 
Allan Morelli— Plymouth Men's Shop 
Harold Morelli— Pioneer Food Store 
Jeannette Pirani — Jordan Hospital Office 
Robert Sampson—Pratt and Whitney 

Aircraft School 
Paul Sears — Northeastern University 
Rita Smith— Cushman's Bakery Shop 
Elizabeth Snow— Plymouth Public Li- 
brary 



48 



THE PILGRIM 




FOREIGN, 



LANGUAGES 



CE QUE NOUS NOUS SOUVENONS 
Mademoiselle Carey nous a quittes 
pour enseigner dans une autre ecole, un 
meilleur poste, ce qu'elle merite. Pour- 
tant, elle nous a laisse des memoires de 
sa vive psrsonalite et de son esprit ad- 
mirable. 

Parce qu'elle comprenait ses eleves ct 
realisait qu'ils ns pouvaient pas finir 
leurs lecons de temps en temps, elle a 
accepte leurs excuses. 




Pendant trois ans, longs et heureux, 
nous avons eu une vie de joie avec Mile. 
Carey, notre petite professeur de fran- 
cais. Tout le monde qui l'a vraiment 
connue, aimait et admirait beaucoup 
cette petite figure droite, brillante, et 
intellectuelle. 

Quand elle avait tort, elle l'admittait 
toujours. Elle a reconnu qu'elle avait 
une humeur fougueuse, mais elle avait 
appris a la conquerir de bonne heure. A 
cause de cela, quand elle s'est fachee, ce 
qui n'a pas eu lieu souvent, ce n'etait 
que pour une bonne raison. 

Elle etait tranche avec ses etudiants et 
elle leur • disait leurs fautes. Parce 
qu'elle s'exprimait avec bienveillance. 
ils ne le ressentaient pas, mais ont ap- 
precie ses conseils et les ont suivis. 




Bien qu'elle aimat a argumenter, elle 
n'etait pas desagreable. Elle croyait que 
l'argument tient l'opinion de tout le 
monde alerte et vivante. 

Comme directrice de la National 
Societe d'Honneur, elle etait un parfait 
modele de tous les ideals de la Societe. 
Elle a fait beaucoup pour employer les 
rtandards de cette organization vers 
l'amelioration de cette ecole. La vie 
montrait l'ideal eleve auquel elle tenait. 
Elle etait religieuse, bienfaisante, sans 
prejuges, et d'un caractere estimable. 

Elle etait pleine d'ambition. Chaque 
tache qu'elle s'est mise a faire elle a 
accomplie. Le travail lui etait une joie 
et elle travaillait avec enthousiasme. 
Elle assistait a toutes les activites de 
1'ecole qu'elle pouvait. Son originalite 
etait prouvee par les assemblies qu'elle 
a dirigees. 

Ses classes etaient toujours interes- 
santes. Elle permettait a ses eleves de 
s'exprimer franchement. Elle offrait ses 
propres experiences pour les exemples 
et pour animer la discussion. 

Nous l'aimions tous et nous la respec- 
tions. Son depart a fait un vide que 
personne ne peut remplir. Cependant, 
nous nous souviendrons d'elle et de tout 
ce qu'elle a fait pour nous. Cette petite 
personne, spirituelle et active, a ete un 
guide aux etudiants. Nous sentons que 
notre ecole a ete une place plus heureuse 
a cause d'elle. 

A BON CHAT, BON RAT 
Dans ma ville natale, il y a deux gar- 
cons du meme age, dont les peres posse- 
dent un magasin ensemble. Aussi il y 
a au fond du magasin une petite bouti- 
que ou on fait nettoyer les habits. Quel- 
quefois les garcons travaillent dans le 
magasin. 

Eh bien! Un jour, il pleuvait a seaux. 
La pluie se formait en mares dans toutes 
les rues et entrait dans les chapeaux et 
les jaquettes. Pauvre Edouard! II entre 



THE PILGRIM 



49 



darn le magasin, mouille, oui, trempe 
j'irqu'aux os. 

'Oh! Pauvre camarade. Permettez- 
mo ; de vous aider," lui dit son ami, 
I'arcel, l'autre gar con. "Restez dans C2 
ccbTirt pendant que j'irai faire sechcr 
vo~ nantalons au tailleur!" 

"Eh bien, mais hatez-vous!" 

Un^ heura passe. Pas de bruit. Les 
ran f aJons doivent etre nettoyes. Une 
d~rri-heure encore passe. Edouard 
dcVde qu'il irait chercher ses pantalons 
. . . rrais helas! . . . maintenant il y a 
deux femmes pres du cabinet qui par- 
lent. Quelle misere! 

Finalement Marcel revient. II donne 
a Edouard les pantalons. "Est-ce qu'il 
n'y aucune autre chose que vous voulez, 
Edouard" 

"Oui," repond Edouard, "s'il vous 
p 7 ait, faites sortir les femmes et quand 
elles seront parties, retournez et permet- 
tez-moi de faire secher vos pantalons 
aussi!" 

Louis Morton '40 



VOS CAMARADES— LES— 
CONNAISSEZ-VOUS? 

Quand devant la classe il joue 
"La Marseillaise" aux accents doux, 
Nous savons que nous entendons 
Un tres bon joueur du violon. 

Georges n'est pas un gar con petit 
Et il ne fait pas beaucoup de bruit, 
Mais quand il est devant la classe 
Comme il rougit — helas, helas. 

Si vous etiez grand comme lui, 
Vous ne seriez pas tres petit, 
Car il a plus de six pieds, 
Et ses yeux bleus sont toujours gais. 

II a un habit verdure 
Qu'il porte presque toujours, 
Et souvent vous trouverez 
Qu'avec Lydia il veut parler. 

Elle s'assied au front de la classe 
Du professeur, elle est en face, 
Si vous demandez, "Est-elle jolie?" 
Tons les gargons repondront, "Oui!" 

Milton Penn '40 



RECONNAISSEZ-VOUS 
CES PROFESSEURS? 

Ell? aims beaucoups sa tasse de the 
E" l?s potits gateaux sucres. 
EI?c n'aime rien qui n'est pas clair: 
La proprete est necesoairD. 

Tous ses eleves doivent travailler, 

' f ris e'est une femme qu'on doit aimer; 

Sa discipline est tres rigide. 

La via est dure, mais pas trop vide. 

E'l? a un favori dessein: 
Les autres choses ne valent rien; 
Ca n'est pas "Amerique" ou "Soir." 
Le "Pilgrim" e'est son grand devoir. 

Ede trouve les erreurs de grammaire. 
L?s longs devoirs qu'elle nous fait 

faire! 
Mais nous aimons cette femme de 

lettres, 
Qui, de nous, fait de meilleurs etres! 

Louis Morton '40 



C'est un jeune homme, grand et 
maigre, qui porte des lunettes. Ses 
cheveux nois sont un peu boucles et il a 
les yeux bleus et vifs. II a un sourire 
agreable, est gai tout le temps, et croit 
que la vie est trop courte pour les tour- 
ments. II prend plaisir a lire de bons 
livres. Dans la salle de classe il est de 
tres bon naturel et toujours veut bien 
aider les eleves. 

Audrey Maloon '40 



Ce professeur est d'une taille ordi- 
naire, et il a des cheveux un peu gris e' 
un nez assez plat, qu'il frotte souvent en 
parlant. Tout le monde aime a l'ecouter 
quand, s'appuyant sur le bureau et une 
main dans sa poche, il raconte une de ses 
drole experiences. II n'est pas souvent 
qu'on peut passer un jour avec lui sans 
entendre le mot, "osmosis." Quelquc- 
fois, quand il n'est pas dans l'ecole. nous 
le voyons dans son "Ford" fidele. 

Alfonse Gamhini '40 



Elle a les yeux bruns et les cheveux 
bruns, et elle est assez grasse. Quand 
elle rit, elle montre ses fossettes. Parce 
qu'elle sait cuire et coudre tres bien, elle 
psut plaire a tout le monde. Quand elle 
s? fache, ce qui est rare, ses yeux bid- 
lent. Elle semble toujours interessee 
dans ses eleves et les aident au.tant quo 
possible avec leurs problemos. 

Helen Hamilton '40 



50 



THE PILGRIM 



Latin 



AENEADAS 

For ten long years we'd held the Greek 
Who charged our very gates, 
When, by the basest treachery. 
He entered with his mates. 

By fire and sword proud Ilium fell 
With carnage, slaughter, flame; 
We fled the jaws of savage lust. 
We, last of Teucer's name. 

The gods forbade a rest in Thrace, 
Pair Crete was not foretold; 
Sweet Sicily was not for us. 
Nor Carthage ours to hold. 

Kind Dido loved Aeneas well, 
Ascanius, too, beseiged her heart; 
But soon her love to hatred turned 
When Hermes made them part. 

At Sicily were funeral games. 
Anchises one year dead; 
And then unto Lavinium 
Our vessels onward sped. 

At Cumae near Avernus Lake 
Dire Sybil led our king 
Into the Shaded Underworld 
To see what Fate would bring. 

At last we reached Hesperia 
And Turnus met defeat! 
We bested the Rutulians, 
Our race had found its seat. 

From this beginning Caesar came. 
Augustus, and the rest — 
With Virgil, chronicler of tales. 
And may his soul be blest! 

— Lucius 



LATIN AND LITERATURE 

Not Peace But a Sword Mars 

Restless Wave Neptune 

Harmony Orpheus 

The Happy Harvest Ceres 

Treasurer Below Proserpina 

Blind Loyalty Penelope 

Daylight Moon Apollo 

Sea Island Lady Venus 

Show me a Land Aeneas 

No More Gas Icarus 

Time-table for Tramps Ulysses 

Hearth and Home Vesta 

Frances Johnson '41 



1. 

2. 

3. 
4. 



5. 
6. 



Teasers to Be Answered with 
Latin Words 

What would there be in the bucket 
if you kicked it? 

What is the name of a famous indi- 
gestion tablet? 

What is a tiny youngster called? 
What does one get as extra pay or 
reward? 

Fill in the blanks with adverbs 
Tom shut up like a 
Don't about me. 

He's from the country; he's a 
Ansivers on Page 53 



How dead life must be in the Styx! 
apis (bee) ] If an apiary is a bee 

' hive, is an aviary 



avis (bird) 

avus (grandfather) J old people's home 



TUES AURl©A£, 




THE PILGRIM 



51 




CTIVITO 



DAY IN — DAY OUT 

Lincoln Street 
Plymouth, Mass. 
February 12, 1940 
Dear Pen Pal, 

I was pleasantly surprised to receive 
your informative letter. Despite the 
great distance between us, our students 
and activities are evidently similar. 

Last September 6 I renewed old friend- 
ships and was introduced to new pupils. 
I must admit it was satsifying to be in- 
habited again after the long summer 
I vacation. 

The first project, which I undertook in 
conjunction with the Junior High School, 
was the sponsoring of the Pulitzer prize 
play, "Craig's Wife," presented by the 
Priscilla Beach Theatre Guild. On the 
evenings of September 28 and 29 my 
auditorium was filled by an appreciative 
audience. 

Mr. Hammett of the C. G. Conn 
Company gave a demonstration of mu- 
sical instruments on Octobor 18. His 
assistant, Mr. Noakes, performed on the 
vibraphone and the glockenspiel, while 
some of my own boys played several of 
the more familiar instruments. 

I was temporarily ignored on the eve- 
ning of October 25 while the opera, 
"Hansel and Gretel," was being pre- 
sented at Memorial Hall. This perform- 
ance benefited both the Junior High 
School and me. 

However, the Senior Dance, held on 
November 4, compensated for this slight. 
My unusual decorations so stirred my 
spirits that I nearly swung along with 
the jitterbugs in time to the rhythms of 
Jay Mando's orchestra. 

Early on the afternoon of November 
10, my student body marched to Memo- 
rial Hall to commemorate Armistice Day. 



There Mr. Daniel Doherty, formerly the 
National Commander of the American 
Legion, delivered a stimulating address. 

The Plymouth Woman's Club held its 
Guest Night within my portals on No- 
vember 15. George Brenton Beal en- 
tertained with an illustrated lecture, en- 
titled "Through the Back Door of the 
Circus." Barkers invited the spectators 
across the corridor to my gymnasium, 
gaily bedecked with circus posters, 
where a festive atmosphere was created 
by vendors with peanuts, popcorn, pink 
lemonade, and ice cream. 

Cider and doughnuts were relished at 
the annual Football Dance on November 
18. Lilting melodies were furnished by 
Giovanetti's orchestra, which is entirely 
composed of boys in my enrollment. 

My Thanksgiving assembly was di- 
rected by Miss Doris Carey, a member 
of the faculty who has now forsaken me 
to teach in Lowell. The program con- 
sisted of selections by the glee clubs, a 
tableau, and an oration by Harold 
Scheid. 

She — I mean he — had even me mysti- 
fied with his convincing make-up. I re- 
fer to William F. Conell, a talented 
mimic, who delivered several mono- 
logues at an assembly on December 8. 

On December 15 I viewed a successful 
dance for the benefit of my band. Louis 
Giovanetti and the boys played for the 
nimble swingsters. 

Christmas was celebrated with a one- 
act play, "It Happened in Bethlehem," 
which was under the competent direc- 
tion of Miss Lydia Judd. The ability 
displayed made me all the more eager 
to witness the principal venture of the 
Student Activities Society, which I had 
learned was to take the form of a school 
play this year. 

Arch Crossley, a fine pianist, was pro- 
cured by Mr. Garland for an assembly 
on January 3. He played popular hits 
as well as classical numbers for the in- 
struction and diversion of my students. 
Moreover, he generously offered to write 
music for a song for me, provided some 
student composed suitable words in my 
praise. 

Professor Samuel H. Cross of Harvard 
University, who spoke on "Power Poli- 
tics or Peace" on January 18, was 
brought to me through the courtesy of 
the Plymouth Teachers' Club. Everyone 
present profited from his erudite address, 
I am sure. 

On January 22 the newly-elected mem- 



52 



THE PILGRIM 



bers of the Massasoit Chapter of the 
National Honor Society were initiated. 
This impressive ceremony was super- 
vised by Miss Doris Carey, the teacher 
sponsor. 

Between January 22 and January 25 
practically every one of my seniors was 
shot. No, there was no revolution. The 
photographer was here to take pictures 
for my yearbook, The Pilgrim. Even a 
night scene of my front entrance was 
snapped. 

Throughout the months of January, 
February, and March adult education 
lectures were presented under the chair- 
manship of Mrs. Miriam Raymond, Miss 
Doris Carey, Mr. John Packard, and 
Miss Viola Boucher — all of my faculty. 
The topics related to good English, cur- 
rent affairs, modern science, and house- 
hold arts. 

The first of three concerts by the 
Plymouth Philharmonic Orchestra was 
conducted by L. Edgar Beauregard on 
January 28. The Men's Glee Club, under 
the direction of Charles E. Killmer, lent 
variety to the program. 

On February 2 "The Mad Hatters," a 
comedy written by Kurtz Gordon, was 
enacted by a number of my pupils, 
coached by Miss Dorris Moore. The up- 
roarious laughter of the audience was so 
infectious that my sides fairly shook 
with merriment. This was the S. A. S. 
activity to which I had been looking for- 
ward. 

On February 5 John Brewer was de- 
clared the winner in the Oratorical Con- 
test, which is sponsored annually by the 
American Legion. Therefore, he was en- 
tered as my contestant in the district 
meet, which was held within my con- 
fines on February 17. In this competition, 
John won third place. 

The Plymouth Woman's Club learned 
more of the activities of the various 
schools on the afternoon of February 7. 
The program was comprised of dramati- 
zations, musical selections by the Junior 
High School orchestra and the elemen- 
tary school glee clubs, and a minuet. 
Exhibitions of art and handicraft and 
project work in several studies were on 
display. 

Mr. Ernest Johnson, a negro singer of 
spirituals, classical music, and popular 
songs, visited me on February 9. He was 
received with enthusiasm as great as 
has been accorded him on previous 
engagements. 

Shakespeare's "Hamlet" was presented 
by the James Hendrickson and Claire 



Bruce company of professional players. 
The project was sponsored by repre- 
sentatives of the senior English classes 
and the library clerks under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. Miriam Raymond. I am 
expecting the addition of many new 
books to my library as a result of this 
venture. 

Reverend Lyle McCorison, the Con- 
gregational minister from Braintree, 
gave an account, on February 12, of 
Abraham Lincoln's advance from a rail 
splitter to the Presidency. His vigorous 
delivery and his obvious love for his 
subject held my interest to the end. 

Willard G. Bertel from the Bentley 
School of Accounting and Finance ad- 
vised my pupils, on March 15, to be wise 
enough to prepare themselves now in 
order that they may fulfill their ambi- 
tions. 

At a Hospital Club entertainment on 
March 27 the Boys' Glee Club, directed 
by Miss Beatrice Hunt, sang several se- 
lections. That was the first opportunity 
they had had this year to demonstrate 
their ability to the public. 

The second in a series of concerts by 
the Plymouth Philharmonic Orchestra, 
conducted by Mr. L. Edgar Beauregard, 
took place on March 31. Two very gifted 
members of my faculty, Miss Beatrice 
Hunt and Mr. John Pacheco, confirmed 
my opinion of their talent. The former 
rendered various vocal numbers, while 
the latter played compositions for the 
clarinet. 

"The Count of Monte Cristo" avenged 
his unjust imprisonment before my ap- 
proving eyes on April 1. On that eve- 
ning puppeteers presented this famous 
play, after they had given "Hans 
Brinker" in the afternoon. 

I was especially occupied on April 5. 
Prizes were awarded to Robert Post, a 
sophomore, Antone Carbone, a senior; 
and Patricia Douglass and Benjamin 
Perry, sophomores; for their posters 
developing the theme: "The Best in 
Motion Pictures." Mrs. Carl Raymond, 
Mrs. George C. Peterson, and Miss Dor- 
ris Moore judged the entries in this con- 
test, which is sponsored annually by the 
Plymouth Woman's Club. In the eve- 
ning of the same da\' joy reigned su- 
preme in my gymnasium where the 
Sophomore Hop was held. This atmos- 
phere of gayety was increased by the 
music of Louis Giovanetti and his Or- 
chestra and the cheerful, springlike 
decorations. 

At the present time I am looking for- 



THE PILGRIM 



53 



ward to several events which will take 
place before the approaching summer 
vacation. Then I shall welcome the 
greatly needed rest and renovation 
which that season always brings. I hope 
that our correspondence may continue 
throughout this summer and for many 
years to come. 

Sincerely, 

P. H. S. 



Answers to teasers 

1- dent 4. bonus 

2 - turn 5. clam 
3. tot 6. vere 

7. hie 

Mary Goddard '42 




STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 

(Reading left to right) 

First Row: Pauline Holmes, Barbara Harlow, Betty Whiting, Mr. Mongan, Miss 

Rafter, Mary Creati, Secretary; Prank Ingenito, President; Joan Holmes, Dean 

Stevens, Vice President; Miss Moore, Elenore Hall, Laura Paoletti 
Second Row: Dorris Bliss, Eleanor Brenner, Marcia Brooks, Anthony Soares, 

Alfonse Gambini, Edwin Bastoni, Mr. Guidaboni, Mr. Romano, George Can- 

nucci, Lydia Brewster, Evelyn Boyle, Agnes Barlow 
Third Row: Theodore Lodi, Robert Wilson, Joseph Lamborghini, Idore Benati, 

Harold Rogers, Alton Zaniboni, George Randall, Edgar Mongan, Harold Scheid, 

Richard Tubbs, Edward Maccaferri 

Teacher Sponsor sibility in the appeal for donations to the 

Miss Amy Rafter Jordan Hospital at Thanksgiving time. 

Founded 1933 36 members Miss Viola Boucher of the Household 

President Frank Ingenito A *" ts Department supervised this under- 

Vice-President Dean Stevens taking, and the number of contributions 

Secretary-Treasurer '.'.'.'.'. Mary Creati ™ as enc ° ura S in g a f the attractive dis- 

play in Room 106 showed. 

Each year the S. A. S. sponsors a num- A play, "The Mad Hatters" was spon- 

ber of interesting assemblies for the stu- sored this year by the S. A. S. to aid the 

dent body. This year they have been in treasuries of some of the major school 

two fields — music and science. organizations. Miss Dorris Moore of the 

The banking system, which was in- English Department coached this three- 
stalled by the S. A. S. last year, was con- act comedy, which was given on Febru- 
tinued this year under the supervision of ary 2 in the High School Auditorium. It 
Miss Elizabeth Kelly of the Commercial was a very successful project, both finan- 
Department. The purpose is to encour- cially and dramatically, and was re- 
age a self-directed habit of saving. peated on February 28 at Carver for the 

The sale of the Christmas Seals was benefit of the Finnish Relief, 

very successful under the leadership of The cheer leaders have been under the 

Mr. Mario Romano. The returns ex- supervision of Mr. Carlo Guidaboni, and 

ceeded last year's record. have been active at the majority of the 

The S. A. S. again assumed the respon- football games his year. 




(Reading left to right) UPLAY CAST 

Umberto Stanghellini, Dorris Bliss, Marcia Brooks, Stanley Cook, Margaret 
Roncarati, Grace Dickson, Miss Moore, Gloria Morelli, Anne Donovan, Gilbert 
Tavares, Lydia Brewster, Lois Chandler, Joseph Lamborghini 




(Reading left to right) BANKERS 

First Row: Margaret DeCost, Audrey Maloon, Ruth Riley, Alfonse Gambini 

Second Row: Edward Maccaferri, Theodore Lodi, Robert Briggs, Arthur Amaral, 

Frederick Wirzburger 
Third Row: Joseph Giovanetti, Milton Penn, John Brewer. Joseph Lamborghini. 

Alvin Montanari, George Shea 




(Reading left to right) CHEER LEADERS 

Thomas Pimental, Agnes Emond, Robert Drew, Bella Rezendes, Edwin Bastoni 



THE PILGRIM 



55 



BEHIND THE SCENES 

TK) those of you who saw the presenta- 
tion of "The Mad Hatters," it was 
little more than a few hours of enter- 
tainment, but to the cast, it meant the 
product of four unforgettable, rehearsal- 
filled weeks. Each day they met, and 
with untiring good spirit accomplished 
a lot or a little, as their moods directed. 
On some days, after a careful compari- 
son of the Hatters of the stage and of 
real life, it was hard to decide which 
were the madder. 

At eight o'clock on February 2 the 
curtain was drawn and Gigi Hatter 
walked upon the stage whistling feebly 
but with a determined I've-got-to-stop- 
shaking air. No one, not even Angel, 
who was standing right beside her, will 
ever know how she tied her sneakers on 
her palpitating feet. The play moved on 
and Bunny entered and gave a smooth 
performance as amusing to the cast as 
to the audience. When Pop entered and 
opened his bewhiskered mouth for his 
first speech, everyone held his breath 
and waited for him to say "Hello, there!" 
There was a muffled explosion when the 
line was omitted. Margaret's part was 



played beautifully the first night, but in 
Carver — well, that was hardly her fault. 
It may have been stage fright that made 
Diana lose her finger-tip control and 
whisper desperately to Bunny to "Hold 
my hand!" 

The sound effects were perfect. There 
had always been uncertainty as to 
whether the noise that preceded "It 
sounds like an airplane," would be a 
rattle that sounded like a banging shut- 
ter or Carter's bass hum — but the elec- 
tric device purred obediently, much to 
the relief of the neck-craning Hatters. 

Those in the wings awaited each 
crisis with suspense. They knew from 
experience that Joe Hatter would com- 
pose some new "fish" story to try Angel's 
self-control. As they watched, they saw 
that one by one the cast grew accustomed 
to the glare of the footlights and learned 
to ignore the barely recognizable faces 
lined up before them, and swing into the 
spirit of the play. 

Of course there were some untoward 
incidents connected with the production 
of the play, including a blizzard, Carver, 
and a very fiat tire, but most of the time 
we had a "regular Hatter's holiday." 
Lydia Brewster '41 




(Reading left to right) JUNIOR PRESS CLUB 

First Row: Doris Anti, Mildred Downey, Doris Bernadoni, Pauline Barengo, 

Walter Corrow, Barbara Sullivan, Evelyn Boyle 
Second Row: Peter Brigida, Elizabeth Howland, Allen Burgess, Miss Moore, 

Mercy Kellen, Richard DiStefano 



Teacher Sponsor 
Miss Dorris Moore 

Founded 1929 17 members 

Membership in this club is open to any 
member of the Junior Class. Instead of 



officers, the club has editors of different 
departments — editor-in-chief, assembly 
editor, alumni editor, and two athletic 
editors. Each Monday the club meets to 
•prepare its news for publication in three 
local papers. 



56 



THE PILGRIM 




ORCHESTRA 

( Reading left to right I 

First Row: Martha Vickery. Genevieve Patturelli. Umberto Stanghellini. Sybil 

Feinberg, Miss Hunt, Frances Johnson, Melquezideque Perry, Dorothy Bagni, 

Mercy Kellen 
Second Row: John Kelley, Wallace MacLean, Lee Roane, Donald Parsons. 

Richard Tubbs, Richard Vaughan. John Brewer, Albert Hatton, Milton Penn, 

Robert Tedeschi, Charles Stasinos, Howard Haire 




BAND 

(Reading left to right) 

First Row: Francis Stas, Manuel Silva, Thomas Pimental, Agnes Barlow, Mr. 

Pacheco, Patricia Douglass, Frederick Wirzburger. John Kelley. Alfred Sitta, 

George Morgardo 
Second Row: Donald Douglas, Howard Haire. Tony Costa, Edwin Bastoni. Lois 

Chandler. Charles Stasinos, George Mansfield. Harold DeCarli, Tony Soares. 

Louis Giovanetti, Albert Hatton, Wallace MacLean. Richard Vaughan. Robert 

Lee, Howard Beever, Richard Tubbs, Joseph Giovanetti, Errington Brown 



THE PILGRIM 



57 




GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

(Reading left to right) 

First Row: Eleanor Gardner, Marylew Haire, Dorothy Gellar, Dorothy Phelan, 
Genevieve Patturelli, Martha Vickery, Doris Bergonzini, Dorothy Morton, 
Helen Whiting, Anne Donovan, Lydia Mongan, Barbara Viets 

Second Row: Lois Chandler, Faith Millman, Dorris Bliss, Bernice Rovatti, 
Ruth Pederzani, Anna Jesse, Laura Sylvia, Mary Smith, Charlotte Adams, 
Naomi Perry, Stella Simmons, Betty Viets, Barbara Fish, Viola Wager 

Third Row: Phyllis Oldham, Dorothy Silva, Margaret Roncarati, Bella Rezendes, 
Dorothy Jesse, Lois Rovatti, Euphemia Gascoyne, Mary Quinlan, Margaret 
DeCost, Eleanor Brenner, Julia Schneider, Mercy Kellen 

Fourth Row: Josephine Morini, Pearl Vitti, Laura Resnick, Anna Scotti, Dena 
Rossi, Lydia Brewster, Barbara Maloon, Marjorie Neal, Shirley Weeden, Nellie 
Youngman, Evelyn Boyle, Leona Vannah, Elizabeth Howland, Alberta Young 




BOYS' GLEE CLUB 

(Reading left to right) , . „ _ , _ 

First Row: Melquezideque Perry, Robert Tedeschi, Walter Corrow, John Rag- 

onetti, Evan Yates, Henry Pina ™ u ^ D * 

Second Row: George Carter, Umberto Stanghellim, Edgar Mongan, Robert Post, 

Allen Burgess 



58 



THE PILGRIM 






J' a- ,t ft t. i t 



(Reading left to right) GIRLS' 4-H CLUB 

First Row: Muriel Humphrey, Barbara Fish, Olga Guidaboni. Dorothy Jesse, 
Euphemia Gascoyne, Aurora Janiero. Theodora Malaguti, Dorris Bliss, Eliza- 
beth Howland 

Second Row: Natalie Wood, Lillian Coggeshall, Margaret Brenner, Mary Ken- 
nedy, Catherine Boutin, Blanche Arruda. Helen Arnold, Miss Eoucher 

Teacher Sponsor 
Miss Viola Boucher 
Founded: 1938 18 members each girl has made a complete spring 

The members of this club are inter- outfit which will be displayed on Girls' 

ested in making their own clothes, and Day in Hanover. 




(Reading left to right* HONOR GROUP 

First Row: Barbara Harlow, Lillian Hall, Tina Pozzi, Bella Rezendes. Dorothy 
Silva, Olga Stanghellini, Mary Souza, Dorris Bliss, Audrey Maloon, Ruth Riley. 
Second Row: Charles Anderson, Robert Briggs. Robert Tavernelli. Lois Chand- 
ler. Lewis Morton. Edgar Mongan, Helen Hamilton, George Moskos. Harris 
Frim, Alfonse Gambini 

Teacher Sponsor 
Mrs. Miriam Raymond 



Founded 1923 



20 members 



Members of this group are those sen- 
iors who have maintained a scholastic 
average of 85% or better during their 



high school course. It is their respon- 
sibility to make all plans for the Com- 
mencement Exercises. They work as 
individuals or on committees from 
March until June. 



THE PILGRIM 



59 




4-H FORESTRY CLUB 

(Reading lef to right) 

First Row: Allen Burgess, Walter Corrow, Mr. Smiley, Robert Cadorette 

Second Row: Stanley Roberts, Charles Anderson 



« « * * ? * « 



. r lf jhu| M% 

mmMgk 



NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

(Reading left to right) 

First Row: Miss Carey, Lillian Hall, Dorris Bliss, John Brewer, Vice President; 

Edgar Mongan, President; Barbara Harlow, Secretary; Ruth Riley, Audrey 

Maloon 
Second Row: Laura Paoletti, Betty Whiting, Dorothy Morton, Lois Chandler, 

Helen Hamilton, Lydia Brewster, Mary Creati 
Third Row: Alfonse Gambini, George Moskos, Lewis Morton, Milton Penn, 

Robert Briggs, Walter Corrow, Charles Anderson 

Teacher Sponsor \ 

Miss Jeanette Jacques 
Founded- 1929 21 members five percent of the Junior class were 

President . . . Edgar Mongan elected, while another five per cent of 

Vice-President John Brewer the Senior class is to be chosen in June. 

Secretary Barbara Harlow Membership in this organization consti- 

y tutes the highest honor to be bestowed 

The members in this society are upon a student in our school, 

chosen by the vote of the faculty on the On March 13, the informal initiation 

bases of scholarship, leadership, service, was held in Room 10 to welcome the new 

and character. In February of this year, members. After the initiation, refresh- 

twelve per cent of the Senior class and ments were served in Room 106. 



60 



THE PILGRIM 



f t f 



* t * f 
* t iff 



* m *f 



+>> t* 



* ***e 



(Reading left to right) SCIENCE CLCB 

First Row: Ronald Butterfield, John Kelley, Errington Brown. Frederick Wirz- 

burger, Mr. Packard, Richard DiStefano. Thomas Brewer. Bradford Smith. 

Robert Fortini 
Second Row: Alfred Holmes, Roderick Magee. Harley Mitchell. Richard Pavesi. 

Albert Pillsbury, Harris Frim, Samuel Franks, William Gault 
Third Row: William Lamborghini. Stanley Roberts, Donald Parsons. George 

Carter, Charles Butterfield, John Hammer. Francis Stas, Norman Longhi 

Teacher Sponsor 

Mr. John W. Packard 

Founded: 1935 26 members 



President Bradford Smith 

Vice-President Harley Mitchell 

(Aviation) 

The Science Club meets once a week 
in Room 102. At one meeting a moving 
picture of naval aviation was shown, and 
in March a shortwave receiving set was 
demonstrated. The club has a shortwave 
transmitter operating on a frequency of 
1840 kilocycles under the authority of 
the Federal Communication call letters 
W1KMU 

At another meeting an interesting con- 
tact was made with the station at Long 
Point Light in Provincetown. The oper- 
ator, Mr. Chase, who is the lighthouse 
keeper, told of the work at the light- 
house. 

The club exhibited airplane models at 
the Bridgewater Science Fair in March, 
and Allen Wall flew a model in the gym- 
nasium. The club also demonstrated a 
complete radio installation in which 
music from a record was amplified, 
picked up to modulate the transmitter, 
and the resulting modulated carrier 
wave was shown on the screen of an 
oscillograph. 



Vice-Pre.side?it Walter Mansfield 

(Radio) 
Secretary-Treasurer Norman Longhi 

The members of the club have been 
trained in the operation of the short- 
wave radio receiver and phonograph 
amplifier, and have set up and operated 
the equipment for teachers in the class- 
rooms or auditorium whenever re- 
quested. 

Plans include trips to airports to study 
airplanes and airport facilities and to a 
radio station. Many members are also 
studying the requirements for licenses 
of radio operators and pilots. 



MY PRAYER 



I ask a favor. Lord: not to be rich 
Above all other men. nor yet to be 
Happy forever. I don't want a niche 
In just the right place for a girl like me. 
I don't want power. God. I don't want fame. 
And beauty is not the jewel I would take. 
For winning stacks of chips in this great game 
I do not care. What if I do lose a stake? 

I pray, perhaps, not often: all the more 

True strengch within my prayer when I do. 

That I may be true to the core — 

This is the favor I ask of You — 

Not released from any pain but made 

Forever and forever unafraid. 

Lillian Hall '40 



THE PILGRIM 



61 




FACULTY 

(Reading left to right) 

First Row: Miss Albertini, Miss Boucher, Miss Rafter, Miss Moore, Mr. Mongan, 

Mrs. Garvin, Miss Johnson, Mrs. Raymond, Miss Jacques 
Second Row: Miss Wilber, Miss Locklin, Miss Kelly, Mr. Smiley, Miss Judd, Mr. 

Bagnall, Mr. Packard, Mr. Guidaboni, Mr. Romano, Mr. Knowlton, Miss Lang, 

Mrs. Brown 




PILGRIM STAFF 

(Reading left to right) 

First Row: Virginia Sampson, Frances Ryan, Lillian Hall, Audrey Maloon, Joseph 
Lamborghini, Alfonse Gambini, Business Manager; Dorris Bliss, Editor-in- 
chief; Walter Corrow, Ass't. Editor; Margaret Roncarati, Mary Creati, Faith 
Millman 

Second Row: Sybil Feinberg, Mrs. Raymond, Helen Hamilton, Caroline Russell, 
Lydia Mongan, Lois Chandler, Lydia Brewster, Dorothy Morton, Barbara Har- 
low, Betty Whiting . ' „ , 

Third Row: Alton Zaniboni, Lewis Morton, Milton Penn, John Brewer, Edgar 
Mongan, Howard Beever, Robert Briggs, Roger Whiting 



62 



THE PILGRIM 




CAMERA CLUB 

( Reading left to right I 

First Row: Angelo Provinzano, Tony Costa, Frances Dretler, Elizabeth Howland, 

Gilbert Tavares, Helen Randall, Anne Donovan, Arthur Rossi 
Second Row: Richard DiStefano, Edward Ribeiro, Harold Strassel, Mr. Guido- 

boni, Stewart Hatch, John St. George, James Ferreira, Peter Brigida 




I 



WHAT GLORY? 

You may preach of fame and glory. 

But it is no pleasant story 

When you're sent to face the enemy under fire; 

When your comrades shriek and die 

And the planes swoop down from on high 

And your regiment is stuck wheel deep in mire. 

And while you sit and wait. 

And wait and freeze and wait, 

Not knowing when those guns will kill you all. 

You think of those back home 

Across the mine-filled foam 

Who sit in dread of gas and air raid call. 

Now in many years gone by, 

When a knight had said good-bye. 

He left his wife and family in good care; 

But today life little means 

With planes and death machines 

To take that life and blast it from the air. 

For War won't spare a soul. 

And its carnage fills a hole 

With lads who should have had a chance in 

life. 
And fellow men have shot 
Without a second thought 
God's children, leaving want and care and 

strife. 
How can this horror last 
At which Christ must stand aghast 
Forsaken by the men He taught to love? 



John Brewer '40 



THE PILGRIM 



63 







K^ra,.. 




Cut*,. 




C.urU., 







T-rutK 





FOOTBALL 

(Reading left to right) 

First Row: Harold Rogers. 
Alton Zaniboni. Sidney 
S h w o m, Edward Ribeiro. 
Frank Ingenito. Alfred Babini 
(capt.l. Gilbert Tavares. Har- 
ris Frim. Albert Pest, George 
Randall 

Second Row: George Car- 
ter. Charles Tavares. Arthur 
Strassel, Martin McAuley. 
Idore Benati, John Brewer. 
Dean Stevens. John St. 
George. Donald McDonald. 
Adelino Bernardo. Angelo 
Prcvinzano 



GRIDIRON NEWS 

/^NOTHER grid season has quickly 
passed. This year's team was headed 
by as fine a football player as ever wore 
the colors of Plymouth High School. 
Captain Alfred Babini. Although his 
tackling and blocking were really things 
to be reckoned with, the team lost five 
games, won three, and tied one. 

Plymouth High opened its season 
against Hingham. There was a double 
setback in this game, the absence of Line 
Coach Mario Romano, who was in the 
hospital recovering from an operation, 
and the absence of Harry Frim and Sid- 
ney Shwom. However, their positions 
were capably filled by Albert Post and 
Martin McAuley. Despite a scoreless tie 
against Hingham. Plymouth looked bet- 
ter than any opening game squad in the 
past few years. 

On the following Saturday Plymouth 
High met Abington, losing 6-2. Abing- 
ton filled the air with passes and scored 
at the close of the second period with a 
twenty-yard pass, while Plymouth's 
score came later in the game. 

Then the Plvmouth High attack 
clicked to beat' Rockland 25-0. The 
thriller of the afternoon was the screen 
pass play which left not only the Rock- 
land team motionless but the fans as 
well. Late in the game, the ball was 
snapped back to MacDonald who faded 
back for about fifteen yards. The Rock- 
land team charged through and thought 
they had him cornered, but he merely 
tossed the ball back to his line of scrim- 
mage where Benati stood waiting with 
six of his own men in front of him. He 
caught the pass, and swept thirty-five 
yards down the field for the final touch- 
down. 

The next Saturday football relations 
were established with a new school. 
Attleboro. From the fray Plymouth 



High returned with a 13-0 defeat. This 
is not offered as an alibi, but Captain 
Babini and quarterback Bernardo were 
both on the injured list. 

On the following Saturday Captain 
Babini was back in the line-up and so 
was Bernardo. The team journeyed to 
Bridgewater and won 13-0. Stevens and 
Bernardo making the touchdowns. 

The light but militant Middleboro 
team was scheduled to play Plymouth 
on the next Saturday, and those boys 
hinted that they had a few surprises in 
store, but because of unfavorable 
weather the game was played on the 
following Monday. Plymouth High 
emerged on the long end of the 19-7 
score. Middleboro opened the game 
with a score, but then Plymouth went 
into action. This game was a battle 
between the opposing fullbacks both 
weighing one hundred and seventy 
pounds. Stevens and Harrison. Stevens 
proved worthy of his position with his 
hard, line-splitting drives. 

The next 

annual classic between Whitman High 
and Plymouth High. The result was that 
a heavy Whitman team, beaten almost 
to the final whistle, put across a touch- 
down and kicked a winning point to beat 
Plvmouth 7-6. The Whitman score 
came in the third period, after Mac- 
Donald had run thirty yards for a touch- 
down in the second period. 

In the Armistice Day game with Wey- 
mouth High. Plymouth was a 20-0 vic- 
tim. A strong wind prevailed that day, 
and it did not work to the disadvantage 
of an alert Weymouth High squad which 
scored all of its three touchdowns in the 
the seven minutes of play. When Plym- 
outh changed goals, the team met with 
considerable success although it was 
unable to reach the Weymouth goal line 
until the very last two plays of the game 
when again the screen pass carried 



game was the fortv-fifth 



Page 64 



BOYS' BASKETBALL 

(Reading left to right) 

First Row: Adelino Ber- 
nardo, Harold Rogers (capt.), 
Arthur Pederzani, Donald 
McDonald 

Second Row: Frank Ingen- 
ito, Henry Darsch, Idorc 
Benati, Dean Stevens, Alton 
Zaniboni, Warren Garuti 




Plymouth to the two-yard line just as 
the final whistle blew. The boys should 
really be commended for their defensive 
play after the "twenty point nightmare." 

The final game of the season was 
against another newcomer to the Plym- 
outh schedule, Barnstable. Plymouth 
needed just one game to balance the win 
and lose column, but lost to Barn- 
stable 6-0. Plymouth was handed many 
chances to score, but lost the ball on 
fumbles. As he played his last game 
for Plymouth, Captain Babini made the 
fans doubt whether there was another 
player in the district who could back 
up a line and center as he did. Three 
others who had been playing for three 
years on the team and who also were 
playing their last game were Tavares, a 
guard; MacDonald, fullback; Zaniboni, 
end; Randall, end; and the 140-pound 
scrappy guard, Ingenito. 

Next year's team is to be led by a 
capable player, Dean Stevens, who 
starred at halfback on this year's team. 
Returning with him to the backfield are 
Bernardo and Benati. Line starters will 
be McAuley, r. t., and Post, b. t. More- 
over, there are also many good prospects 
on the second team who have earned the 
opportunity to demonstrate what they 
can do on the team of 1940. 

The Season's Record 









3core 


Opponent 


Place 


Opp. 


P.H.S. 


Hingham 


Hingham 








Abington 


Plymouth 


6 


2 


Rockland 


Rockland 





25 


Attleboro 


Attleboro 


13 





Bridgewater 


Bridgewater 





13 


Middleboro 


Plymouth 


7 


19 


Whitman 


Plymouth 


7 


6 


Weymouth 


Weymouth 


20 





Barnstable 


Plymouth 


6 






Alton Zaniboni '40 



STILL "CHAMPS" IN PLYMOUTH 

r FHE boys began this year's hoop sched- 
ule with a victory over the Alumni. 
Then of the fifteen games which followed 
they won six and lost nine. During the 
season Captain Harold Rogers distin- 
guished himself by earning the highest 
scoring average. 

Plymouth's first defeat was at the 
hands of Abington by a mere three 
points. The following two games were 
victories over Hingham and Rockland. 
In the next encounter the Plymouth 
boys met the best team on the schedule, 
Braintree, before whom they twice went 
down to defeat. Later they also lost two 
games to Weymouth and East Bridge- 
water and another game to Abington. 
Their remaining victories were over 
Bourne, Middleboro, and Hingham. 

The thriller of the season was played 
at Plymouth High School gymnasium 
against East Bridgewater. At the end of 
the first half Plymouth trailed by a 
score of 19 to 9, but in the second half 
tied the score. Then the game ended 
and an overtime period had to be played, 
from which East Bridgewater emerged 
the winner by a 28-26 score. 

When the season ended, Coach Knowl- 
ton called practice for his Brockton 
Tournament squad, which consisted of 
Captain Harold Rogers, Pederzani, Ran- 
dall, Garuti, Darsch, Bernardo, Zaniboni, 
Stevens, MacDonald, and Cingolani. 
Plymouth's first opponent was Oliver 
Ames. The game was a see-saw affair, 
providing thrills galore to the finish. 
Plymouth led at the quarter 11 to 10, 
and at the half 19 to 17— but North 
Easton went out in front at the close 
of the third period, 27 to 26. In the final 
quarter Captain Bradley of Oliver Ames 



Page 65 



$ Q.3 Q a 




BASKETBALL GIRLS 

(Reading left to right) 

First Row: Aurissa Holmes. 
Barbara Harlow, Euphemia 
Gascoyne, Lois Rovatti, 
Blanche Arruda. Barbara 
Kritzmacher 

Second Row: Mrs. Garvin. 
Dorothy Morton, Lydia Brew- 
ster, Nancy Reagan, Eleanor 
Gardner, Frances Kierstead 

Third Row: Viola Wager. 
Anna Scotti. Isabelle Roberge. 
Dena Rossi. Florinda Leal. 
Bernice Rovatti 



sank a side shot to give his team a three- 
point lead. The game could have gone 
the other way, but Plymouth won by a 
36-33 score by staging a sensational rally 
with less than three minutes of the last 
quarter remaining. 

In the next game Plymouth's scrappy 
aggregation, flashing some classy basket- 
shooting, proved too much for Stough- 
ton High, when Plymouth defeated 
the Hockamock League champions by 
a score of 38-25. Plymouth pressed 
Stoughton all the way, but played the 
best ball in the second period when the}' 
surged to a ten-point lead and held it 
throughout the game. This victory 
put Plymouth Hiph into the semi-finals 
against Hingham High. 

The name of Captain Harold Rogers 
will stand in the Plymouth High record 
books as one of the school's basketball 
heroes after his brilliant performance in 
this game, which turned apparent defeat 
into a "sudden death" overtime period. 
If the game was a glorious victory for 
Plymouth, it must have been a heart- 
breaking defeat for the Hingham team. 

The next game was Abington vs. 
Plymouth in the South Shore Class A 
Finals. Here, after a brilliant record 
throughout the Tournament, Plymouth 
was nosed out by Abington by a 39 to 
38 score. Both teams provided the crowd 
with thrills galore. Plvmouth led at the 
quarter 9 to 6, trailed at the half 22 to 17, 
while the count at the end of the third 
period was a tie, 30 to 30. The rest of the 
game was a see-saw affair with sensa- 
tional basket-shooting. Much praise is 
due to Plymouth after its "hot and cold" 
campaign during the regular season, for 
the squad certainly played a very fine 
brand of basketball throughout the 
tournament. 

To us the boys are still champions! 



Brockton Tournament 



First round 


Oliver Ames 33 Plymouth 36 


Second round 


Stoughton 25 Plymouth 38 


Semi-finals 


Hingham 40 Plymouth 42 


Finals 


Abington 39 Plymouth 38 




Alton Zaniboni '40 



BASKETBALL PLAY DAYS 

A NEW type of basketball program was 
planned for the girls this year, its 
aim being to give every girl an oppor- 
tunity to play on a team, rather than to 
concentrate competition among the few 
who readily show skill. A series of six- 
teen inter-class games was played with 
the championship going to the Senior 
class, who maintained a seven-point lead 
over the. Juniors in their second match. 
This group joined in a contest with the 
alumnae, which resulted in a 17-15 score 
in favor of the school team. 

Honor Class teams selected from each 
group entertained Bourne at a Play Day 
which resulted in victories for the Plym- 
outh teams, but allowed them an oppor- 
tunity to admire the spirit and skill of 
their opponents. Seniors and Juniors 
joined with Bridgewater in a Color 
Team Play Day, the tournament style 
of play proving very popular and the 
competition so close that only the time 
element determined the winners. Not 
only did the girls have opportunities to 
make new friendships in a Play Day 
spirit, but they learned to plan for re- 
freshments, decorations, awards, and 
officiating. 

There is no schedule of inter-school 
games won and lost, but it is certain 
that eighty girls had a fair chance to 
show qualities of cooperation, initiative, 
good fellowship, and leadership in their 
basketball program this winter. 



Page 66 



FIELD HOCKEY 

(Reading left to right) 

First Bow: Edna Raymond, 
Dorothy Jesse, Elizabeth Du- 
puis, Barbara Harlow. Aurissa 
Holmes, Eleanor Gardner, 
Lydia Brewster, Virginia 
Sampson, Martha Lemius, Eu- 
phemia Gasccyne, Lois Ro- 
vatti, Agnes Barlow 

Second Row: Mrs. Garvin, 
Joan Gardner, Pasqualina 
Farina, Dorothy Mcrton, Helen 
Whiting, Marian Radcliffe, 
Alba Pasolini, Pauline Frey- 
ermuth, Martha Teixeira, 
Laura Paoletti, Anna Jesse, 
Barbara Kritzmacher 

Third Row: Frances John- 
son, Betty Viets, Barbara 
Viets, Augusta Stephani, Mar- 
cia Brooks, Anne Donovan, 
Arlene Pirani, Betty Whiting, 
Gina Alviti, Tina Pozzi, Argea 
Guidetti 




TEAM, FIGHT! 

'TO the many girls interested in field 
hockey these words will recall the 
hard-fought games which were played 
this season. They will remember those 
exciting times when the score was tied, 
when they cheered their schoolmates on 
to victory and to occasional defeat. Any 
spectator at the games could see that 
the girls played for the love of the game 
and with consideration for the dictates 
of sportsmanship — even though defeat 
was certain. They simply enjoyed 
every minute of every game. 

Plymouth won its first game against 
Scituate, but the glory of this victory 
was somewhat clouded because the girls 
were defeated in the next two games 
with Middleboro and Scituate. Still 
Plymouth later tied Middleboro and en- 
joyed victories over Marshfield, Bourne, 
and the alumnae. Incidentally, many 
people attended the alumnae game on 
Thanksgiving Day when old acquain- 
tances were renewed. 

This year, in addition to the usual 
inter-scholastic games, Mrs. Beatrice 
Garvin organized inter-class games. 
There were so many girls who wished to 
play hockey, eighty-eight to be exact, 
that eight teams were formed. The Sen- 
iors had one team, the Juniors, two; 
the Sophomores, three. The ninth grade 
girls, who are now able to play hockey, 
had two teams also. There were several 
inter-class games, and many girls who 
would not otherwise have participated 
enjoyed playing with and against their 
schoolmates. 

To the girls of next year's hockey sea- 
son may the words "Team, Fight!" sug- 
gest just what is expected of them when 
the center forward bullies for the first 
time in every game. 



Hockey Schedule 

October 11 

Plymouth 1 

Seconds 
October 17 

Plymouth 

Seconds 
November 1 

Plymouth 

Seconds 
November 7 

Plymouth 1 

Seconds 
November 16 

Plymouth 1 

Seconds 1 
November 21 

Plymouth 1 

Seconds 2 
November 30 

Plymouth 4 Alumnae 



Scituate 

Seconds 

Middleboro 2 

Seconds 1 

Scituate 2 

Seconds 

Middleboro 1 

Seconds 1 

Marshfield 

Seconds 

Bourne 

Seconds 2 



"gADMINTON is the major spring 
sport for girls in the Senior High 
School. At one o'clock they rush to 
the gymnasium in great numbers in 
order to gain a chance to play first. 
About half-past two the gymnasium 
becomes a "co-educational recreation" 
play center, as the boys drop in to 
show the girls that they don't know all 
the tricks. 

Other spring sports are bowling, 
shuffleboard, and ping pong, which has 
just been introduced this year. 

At the end of the season an award in 
the form of a statuette will be given to 
the girl having the highest bowling 
average. Indications are that Euphemia 
Gascoyne will become the proud owner. 
There are also scheduled class bowling 
contests under these captains: Seniors, 
Euphemia Gascoyne; Juniors, Martha 
Lemius; Sophomores, Isabelle Roberge. 

There are over sixty girls taking part 
in tournaments, most of them entering 
the entire field of badminton singles, 
badminton doubles, table tennis and 
shuffleboard. 



68 



THE PILGRIM 



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THE PILGRIM 



69 



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These are the prize-winning pictures in the candid 
camera contest conducted by The Pilgrim. The judges. Mr. 
John Packard, Edgar Mongan, and Caroline Russell, awarded 
the first prize of $3.00 to Vincent Barratta, the second prize 
of $2.00 to Robert Tedeschi, the third prize of $1.00 to 
Stanley Cook. 



70 



THE PILGRIM 




E^CHJltiqES 




"Must Sees" At The Fair 



Sachem illustrations 

Indian 

Mattakeesett school events 




Unquity Echo literature 

Exhibit 

Wampatuck block prints 



Clipper 



literature 



Aeronautics 
Building 










Plymouth H. S., 

England 


$ffl 




m 


i 


nJniT 


§NK HSI 


if 


J editorials 


^. 


J^-s'' 


Critish 
l'avillion 



Parrot 



'Personal Touch' 




Partridge 



candid camera 



The Zoo 



Travel and Reflector 

Communications • 




senior features 



Voice 



club news 



Abhis 

Principal's Page 
Independence 

candid camera 



New England Exhibit 




THE PILGRIM 



71 



CYCLE of ERROR 



\VO IN (POfEMTlOW/ 




ItlEKE W£ HAVE OUR FUTURE WCcHSCHXL 
MAN. HE 15 TEACHING HIMSELF To COUNT 1 
ONELITTLEPICAY THIS IS PROMISING,! 



Jj^NDINC}- THAT HE NEEDS A LITTLE HELP 
(NEDIXATIN4 HIMSELF HE DECIDE S TO 
qO TO SCHOOL WJHERE- HE IS SURE HE 
CAN LEARN ALL HE NEEDS Td KM OVU 



i\BE)CT,0l>R SCHOLAR ENTERS (JOOD OLD 

EWS. WHICH HE WILL KEMEHBCR ALL 

HWDAYS FOU HERE HE LEARNED TO £ET 

THE MOST OL>T dfcEADIN'/RITIN'.'RJTHMTIC 




||[T IS PROBABLE THAT WITHIN THOSE WALLS 
^OUR HERO HAS HIS FIRST CRUSH— AH ' 
BUT SOOH HIS SHIRTSLEEVE DAVS WILL 
BE OVER..FOR HIS NEXT STEP IS P.HS .f 



' fflo HIM PH.S IS ALMOST A NEW EAPE ■ 
RlENCE. His FIRST STEP TOWARDS 
(^ROWING UP IS MADE WHEN HE. 
DONS A SWEATER— ■ 



_ja Junior he becomes rather a world 

bf-WISC PERsfU, EXPRESSING THIS QUAL- 
ITY WITH AN ASTCNISHINtj- VARIETY OF 
DRESS. WHAT A MOTLEY CtjE W M - -- _ 




MERE WE HAVE THAT ULT*A SOPHISTICATE 
of all hi^M schools, the Senior . He 5 

RATHEH. MATVRE. [hETWINIcsJ AND EVEN IS IN- 
COMING SET IN HIS WAV6. SOON HE WILL 
ftRAPLATE.BE SET ADRIFT IN THE WPRLP— 





NP HEKEVJEFIND HIM ADRIFT, DEF1N - 

ITEly'CtONEWITHTIIEWInD. BEWILDERED 
HCTRiES TO THINK .BUTTHE BIROS, BEES, 
AND BUNNIES DISTRACT HIM. HE FINDS 
HE IS BUT A BADE IN THE WOULD, 



o 



[ES, INDEED, A BAI3E'" 

— A V f> TjwWi g|"p m 



72 



THE PILGRIM 



M. D. COSTA 

FRUIT STORE 


DUNLAP OIL SERVICE 
GULF PETROLEUM SERVICE 

SERVICE STATION 

23 Sandwich St. Tel. Plymouth 1278 


Dr. George S. Wild 

Optometrist 

12 Main Street PLYMOUTH 


Best Wishes 
Leonore's Beauty Salon 


We hope that you will 
do unto Our Advertisers 
as they have done by us. 



Oh! My! 
If an "S" and an "I" and an "O" and a "U" 

With an "X" at the end spells Su, 
And an "E" and a"Y"and an "E" spell "I" 

Pray what is a speller to do? 
Then if also an "S" and an "I" and a "G" 

And an "H," "E," "D," spell side — 
There is nothing on earth for a speller 
to do 

But to go and commit Siouxeyesighed. 



Two in Four 

Senior: You mean to tell me that 
you've been shaving for four years. 

Frosh: Yes, and I cut myself both 
times. 



Severest Friend 

"What do you think would go well 
with my purple and green golf stock- 
ings?" 

"Hip boots." — Open Road 



Not Right But Left 
Art: What's that noise down there? 
Dart: Fella in an auto turned a corner. 
Art: Well, what about it? 
Dart: There wasn't any corner. 



It All Depends 

"How old are you. sonny?" 

"That's hard to say, sir. According to 
my latest school tests, I have a psycho- 
logical age of 11 and a moral age of 10. 
Anatomically I'm 7; mentally, I'm 9. But 
I suppose you refer to my chronological 
age. That's 8 — but nobody cares about 
that these days." 



3 Easy Lessons 
James Roosevelt was called upon to 
address a meeting in Hollywood recent- 
ly. "My father gave me these hints on 
speech-making," he said. "Be sincere 
... be brief ... be seated." 



In Memoriam 
He rocked the boat, 
Did Ezra Shank; 
These bubbles mark 

o 

o 

o 

o 
Where Ezra sank! 



Will 



A drill sergeant was drilling the re- 
cruit squad in the use of the rifle. All 
went smoothly until blank cartidges 
were distributed. The recruits were in- 
structed to load their pieces and stand 
at "ready", and then the sergeant gave 
the command, "Fire at will!" 

Private Lunn was puzzled. He lowered 
his gun. "Which one is Will?" he asked. 

Where It Was 

All through the game an enthusiast 
had loudly urged the home team to 
victory. But suddenly he became silent. 
Turning to his pal, he whispered, "I've 
lost my voice." 

"Don't worry," was the reply, "you'll 
find it in mv left ear." 



In time of war, the first casualtv is 
truth. — Boake Carter 



THE PILGRIM 



73 



Carver's Drug Store 

Now Serving 

Light Lunches, Toasted 
Sandwiches, etc. 

Meet Your Friends 
At CARVER'S Fountain 

Complete Line of Toilet Articles 

Reg. Pharmacist 
Always in Attendance 



Plymouth Rock 
Hardware Co. 



62 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 

Telephone 950 



CLOTHES FOR GRADUATION 



SUITS 

WHITE FLANNELS 

SHIRTS 

HOSIERY 



SPORT COATS 
SPORT SLACKS 
SWEATERS 
TIES 



MORSE & SHERMAN 



Court Street 



WM. J. SHARKEY 



Plymouth 



114 Sandwich Street 



Bailey Motor Sales, Inc. 

Plymouth, Mass. 



Tel. 1090 



Buick and Pontiac Sales and Service 
G. M. C. Truck Sales and Service 

A reliable place to trade! . . . One of the best equipped Service Stations 

in this vicinity . . . 24-hour service . . . Open day and night . . . 

Agents for Exide Batteries 

DON'T FORGET— All of our REPAIR WORK is GUARANTEED 

A Fine Selection of 

USED CARS AND TRUCKS 



to choose from at all times 



74 



THE PILGRIM 



CURRIER'S 

Restaurant and Ice Cream Shop 

Local Dealer for 
Whitman and Kemp Products 



63 Main St. 



PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



PLYMOUTH BEEF CO. 

Telephone 604 

Wholesale Beef, Lamb, Pork 
and Provisions 



Off Lothrop St. 



PLYMOUTH. MASS. 



WHITNEY SHIRTS 



MALLORY HATS 



PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 



WM. CAVICCHI. Prop. 



Tel. 341 



18 Main Street 

LOW OVERHEAD — REASONABLE PRICES 

Inquire about Our Special Offer on Suits for Graduates 

CONGRESS SPORTSWEAR CHARACTER CLOTHES 



CARROLL 
CUT-RATE PERFUMER 

47 Main Street Next to Fire Station 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Stern 

LILLIAN'S BEAUTY SHOP 
158 Court Street 



Relief for ACID STOMACH 
BISMA-REX 

Four Action Antacid Powder 
Neutralizes Acidity — Removes Gas — 
Soothes Stcmach — Assists Digestion 

Big Bottle 50c 

SAVE with SAFETY at 

COOPER DRUG COMPANY 
BEMIS DRUG COMPANY 

"The 6 Busy REXALL Stores" 

Abington -- N. Abington -- Rockland 

"In Plymouth It's Cooper's" 



COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 



CASTLE PHOTO SERVICE 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

PHOTO FINISHERS 



Compliments of 
DR. E. HAROLD DONOVAN 

BENJAMIN D. LORING 

Diamonds — Watches — Jewelry 

Silverware 

Gifts and Clocks 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



28 Main St. 



Plymouth, Mass. 



THE PILGRIM 75 



Northeastern 
University 




College of Liberal Arts 

Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for the 
understanding of modern culture, social relations, and technical achievement. 
The purpose of this program is to give the students a liberal and cultural edu- 
cation and a vocational competence which fits him to enter some specific type 
of useful employment. 

College of Business Administration 

Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in the principles 
of business with specialization in Accounting, Journalism, Banking and Finance, 
Public Administration, Industrial Administration or Marketing and Advertising. 
Instruction is through lectures, solution of business problems, class discussions, 
motion pictures and talks by business men. 

College of Engineering 

Provides complete college programs in Engineering with professional courses 
in the fields of Civil, Mechanical (with Diesel, Aeronautical, and Air Con- 
ditioning options), Electrical, Chemical, Industrial Engineering, and Engineering 
Administration. General engineering courses are pursued during the freshman 
year; thus the student need not make a final decision as to the branch of engi- 
neering in which he wishes to specialize until the beginning of the sophomore 
year. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Co-operative Plan, which is available to upperclassmen in all courses, pro- 
vides for a combination of practical industrial experience with classroom in- 
struction. Under this plan the student is able to earn a portion of his school 
expenses as well as to make business contacts which prove valuable in later years. 

Degrees Awarded 

Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Science 

Pre-legal Programs Available 



FOR CATALOG — MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 
Northeastern University 
Director of Admissions 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Please send me a catalog of the 
[ ] College of Liberal Arts 
[ ] College of Business Administration 
[ ] College of Engineering 
[ ] Pre-Legal Program 



Name 



Address 



H-84 



76 THE PILGRIM 



Your MUTUAL SAVINGS BANKS 
IN PLYMOUTH 

NOW HAVE 2,250 

SCHOOL SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 
REPRESENTING $9,000.00 



FOR GRADUATION — FOR COLLEGE 

SAVE WITH SAFETY 

WHERE YOU SEE THIS EMBLEM 




PLYMOUTH SAVINGS BANK 
PLYMOUTH FIVE CENTS SAVINGS BANK 



THE PILGRIM 



77 



FIRST NATIONAL STORES 

25 Main Street, Plymouth 



O. R. SAYRE 



W. G. WOOD 



C. PAUL 

For Your 

SHOES AND REPAIRING 

Honest Values Dependable Service 



53 Court St. 



PLYMOUTH 



OUTCHLAND 

^^^^ U PAT OFF -^^^^ 

ROUTE 3 — KINGSTON 

COMPLETE LUNCHEONS and DINNERS 

AND ALWAYS 

DUTCHLAND FARMS ICE CREAM 



£C£4 Qxr- €> 'DuXzhJUvrvd 7 



PLYMOUTH MOTOR SALES 



AUTHORIZED 



MERCURY 



3vm£ 



LINCOLN-ZEPHYR 



Ask for Demonstration 



181 Court St. 



Tel. 1247-W 



78 



THE PILGRIM 



DUTTON MOTOR CAR CO. 

115 Sandwich Street 

OLDSMOBILE 
CADILLAC • LA SALLE 

Tel. 1500 
SALES SERVICE 


H. A. BRADFORD 

Distributor for 
S. S. PIERCE SPECIALTIES 
Birdseye Frosted Foods 

1 Warren Ave. Tel. 1298-W 


Helen's Beauty Shop 

BEAUTY CULTURE 

In All Its Branches 

19 Court Street 
Tel. 213-M 


The Store of Values 

DEXTER o store 

STYLES AND QUALITY 

39 Court St. PLYMOUTH, MASS. 
Telephone 183-W 


SILVIO LEONARDI 

PIONEER FOOD STORE 

289 Court St. PLYMOUTH 
Telephone 53 


PETROLEUM SALES and SERVICE, Inc. 

Agents for 
THE ATLANTIC REFINING CO. 

Filtered Range and Fuel Oils White Flash Gasoline 
Atlantic High Film Strength Motor Oils 

HEDGE ROAD PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Telephone, Plymouth 1499 



THE PILGRIM 



79 



IT HAS BEEN OUR GREAT PLEASURE TO SERVE 
BOTH THE HIGH AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 
DURING THE SCHOOL YEARS FROM 1929 TO 1940 



LAHEY ICE CREAM CO. 



10 Nelson Street. PLYMOUTH 



Tel. 160 



The MEMORIAL PRESS 

Printers and Publishers Since 1822 

This School Magazine is a 
Product of Our Presses 



Middle Street 



Tel. 77 Plymouth, Mass. 



(§lb (ttnUmg Memorial 

THE NEWSPAPER OF PLYMOUTH 

Be a part of Your Community by 
Reading the (§ib (Efllflttg Memorial Every Week 



Full News Coverage 



Courageous Editorial Opinion 



80 



THE PILGRIM 



CAPE FUEL MART 

Millar Coal and Oil Company 
PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

To Buy Your Winter's Fuel Supply 

Ask About Our 

NEW FUEL BUDGET PLAN 



NEW ENGLAND COKE 



NEW RIVER 
BITUMINOUS 



FIREPLACE WOOD 



KINDLING 



RANGE & 
FUEL OIL 



DISTRIBUTORS FOR 

FAMOUS READING ANTHRACITE 

THE LOW ASH HARD COAL 

LAUNDERED AND TRADE-MARKED 

FOR YOUR PROTECTION 



PLYMOUTH ROCK ALLEYS 

OPEN DAILY 10 A. M. - 12 P. M. 

OPEN SUNDAYS 1 P. M. - 12 P. M. 



Opposite Railroad Station 



Tel. Plymouth 855 



BANDER'S 

PLYMOUTH'S MOST POPULAR 
WOMEN'S SHOP 



54 Main St. Tel. 38 Plymouth 



Congratulations to the 
SENIOR CLASS 

Prtanlla ffiaxb 

Hand Weavers 

THE TIE SHOP 

18 Middle St. PLYMOUTH 



THE PILGRIM 



81 



If it's new 
you'll find it at 



GRANT'S 



the value spot in Plymouth 



Town Brook Service Station 



LUBRICATION 



Repairing — 24 Hour Service 



Tel. 820-W 



D. E. REID 

Wholesale Confectionery 
Paper Specialties 

DEPENDABLE SERVICE 



PLYMOUTH & BROCKTON 
STREET RAILWAY CO. 

Ride Our Modern 
AIR-CONDITIONED BUSES 



Sandwich St. 



Plymouth 



BELL SHOP 



Hosiery, Underwear, Corsetry 



Phone 1134-M 



17 Alvin Road 






12 Court St. 



PLYMOUTH 



Best Wishes 



SHERMAN'S 



PLYMOUTH 



NO. PLYMOUTH 



82 



THE PILGRIM 



PLYMOUTH LUMBER CO. 

Plymouth, Mass. 

BUILDING MATERIALS OF ALL KINDS 

Tel. 237 


EDDIE'S SHOE SYSTEM 

18 Main St. 
Enna-Jettick Shoe Store 

EDDIE HAND. Manager 


CENTRAL SHOE REPAIR 

The only "Up-to-Date" Shoe Repairing and 
Shoe Shine Parlor in Plymouth County 

Hats Cleaned and Reblocked 

37 Main St. PLYMOUTH 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 


W. R. Davis R. S. Hatch 

Davis & Morgan Electric Co. 

ELECTRICAL PROULEMS 
HONESTLY SOLVED 

DEPENDABLE WIRING 

Plymouth Since 1919 Tel. 290 


Gambinis 

Air Conditioned 
LUNCHEONETTE 


PIAZZI, the Florist 

Choicest Cut Flowers and Potted Plants 
Funeral and Wedding Work a Specialty- 
Expert Floral Designs We Qroiv Oar Own Flowers 

PHONE 1518 4 CORDAGE TERRACE EXT. 



THE PILGRIM 



83 



BEST WISHES FOR SUCCESS 



AFTER GRADUATION 



PROM 



BUTTNER'S 



LOOKING FOR A DIGNIFIED VOCATION ? . . . 

STUDY BEAUTY CULTURE 

IN ITS MOST ADVANCED FORM 



We prepare young men and women for a life of refinement 
. . . interesting work . . . security and prosperity. COURSES 
are complete and systematized, with sound proven prin- 
ciples correctly applied. Our INSTRUCTORS have been 
carefully prepared to a required standard, and each one 
is a GRADUATE of the ACADEMY itself. This feature 
insures capable presentation of all subjects which are 
essential in any professional training center. CLASS- 
ROOMS are spacious and modernly equipped ... an entire 
building is devoted for this purpose. The number of high- 
class positions filled by our FREE PLACEMENT BUREAU 
has increased yearly for more than a decade, assuring 
undeniable success to our graduates. 

MODERATE TUITION — CONVENIENT PAY- 
MENT TERMS— DAY AND EVENING CLASSES 

Further information regarding your own possibilities in 

this vocation gladly furnished. Write for free booklet — 

or visit our Academy without obligation. 



WILFRED ACADEMY 




492 Boylston St. 



of Hair and Beauty Culture 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Kenmore 0880 



84 



THE PILGRIM 



W. N. SNOW & SON 

F. R. SNOW, Proprietor 

Window Shade Shop FURNITURE 



Linoleum 



TOTRUST 

The rust preventive oil paint 



BONDLITE 

Paints safely over calcimine 



STAINCURE 

Stops bleeding stains 

Write or call for complete descriptive circulars 

46 Market Street Plymouth 931 



PLYMOUTH SUPPLY CO. 

PLUMBING, HEATING, 
PAINT, and HARDWARE SUPPLIES 



39 Court St. 



Tel. 1423 



CLOUGH'S 

The Complete Food Market 
84 Summer St. Tel. 459 



Phone 406 

Hours: 9:15 to 11:30—1:15 to 5:00 

And By Appointment 

DR. FRANK L. BAILEY 
OPTOMETRIST 

Russell Bldg. Plymouth, Mass. 

Compliments of 
CHARLES W. ORTOLANI 

Proprietor of 

KELLER'S HOME BAKERY 



SflDOOJ'S 

/asnion (enter 



Shows the NEWEST in Misses and 
Women's Wear at Moderate Prices 



BORZAN BEAUTY SALON 

Permanents §3.50 

End Permanents $2.50 

Machineless Permanents .... $5.00 

Machineless Ends $3.00 

Hair Cuts, Finger Waves, Manicures, Eyebrows and Hair Trimming 

Priced at 35c 

MISSES BORSARI AND ZANDI 

20 North Spooner Street North Plymouth 

Call MISS ZANDI 



THE PILGRIM 



85 



JOSEPH J. WOOD 

Successor to Anthony Atwood 
Dealer in 

FRESH, SALTED and 

PICKLED FISH 

Scallops, Lobsters, Oysters, and Clams 

Telephone 261-262 

THE VIOLIN SHOP 

ROGER S. KELLEN 
Dealer in 

Old Violins, Violas, and Cellos 

Large Assortment of Cases, Bows, 

Strings, etc. 

Artistic Repairing A Specialty 

9 Winslow St. Tel. 1420 Plymouth, Mass. 

When there is better work done, 
we will do it. 

GOVI'S TAILOR SHOP 

Telephone 662 
Main Street PLYMOUTH 



KAY'S CUT-RATE 

21 Main Street 

PATENT MEDICINES, 
COSMETICS 

Lowest Prices in Town 
Telephone 1187-W 

JIM'S RESTAURANT & GRILL 

Regular Dinners — A La Carte Service 
Shore Dinners Our Specialty 

5 and 7 Main Street PLYMOUTH 

ELIZABETH M. FOSTER 
BEAUTY SHOP 

Room 10 Buttner Building 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



For The GRADUATION QJFT 
Give a fine Watch or Ring 

We carry a complete line of Nationally Advertised Watches: 

Bulova, Benrus, Elgin, Gruen, Hamilton, Waltham, and Longines. 

Friendship and Birthstone Rings; Sheaffer Pen and Pencil Sets; 

Umbrellas; Overnight Cases; Tie and Collar Sets; Bill Folds; 

Lockets, Crosses, Bracelets, Rosaries, Toilet Sets 

PAY AS LITTLE AS FIFTY CENTS A WEEK 



jewelrA /company 

^V/V /h/\\ V 



Visit Our 
OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

Eyes Examined — Glasses Fitted 

Dr. Samuel Swartz, Reg. Optometrist 
in charge 



86 



THE PILGRIM 



r 



Placement Service 

Provided Free to all 

Graduates 




^m 



Previous Commercial 
Training Not Re- 
quired for Entrance 



YY here Success Stories of Tomorrow 
Begin to lake Form 



For 61 years, Burdett College has been offering specialized business 
training to the young people of New England. In its five-story, con- 
venient building in downtown Boston, the success stories of tomorrow 
begin to take form. Here young men and women acquire solid foun- 
dations in business fundamentals, in skill subjects, and cultural- 
social studies. They learn to think for themselves, and to think 
straight. Carry hope into achievement by deciding now to learn more 
about Burdett College ... its experienced faculty ... its enviable 
reputation among employers. 

Burdett College 



Send for Day or 
Evening Catalogue 



156 Stuart Street, Boston, Mass. 

HANcock 6300 



Fall Term Begins 
September 3, 1940 



JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Your Hardware Store for 115 Years 

PAINTS, HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES 
PLUMBING, HEATING, SHEET METAL WORK 



1 Main Street, Plymouth 
Tel. 283 



YOUR APPEARANCE WILL COUNT! 

Graduation time is the time, naturally, when you want to appear 

at your best. Your clothing for this occasion will aid a 

great deal. Visit our store and let us assist you 

in selecting your graduation outfit. 

We feature the finest in nationally advertised lines. 

PURITAN CLOTHING CO. 

"Home of Dependability" 



56 MAIN STREET 



PLYMOUTH 



THE PILGRIM 



87 



Compliments of 



CAPPANNARI BROS. 



Brockton Business College 

offers 
ADVANCED TRAINING FOR BUSINESS 

One and Two-Year Courses prepare the 
individual student thoroughly, rapidly, and 
inexpensively for a productive place and 
promotion in the business world. For latest 
bulletins address, George E. Bigelow, Prin- 
cipal, 226 Main Street, Brockton, or call 
at our College office. 

"Our graduates are in demand. 
There's a reason." 

FOUNDED 1892 



SIBLEY'S SHOE STORE 

Exclusive Agents in Plymouth for 

AIR- STEP Shoes for Women 

ROBLEE Shoes for Men 

BUSTER BROWN Shoes for 
Boys and Girls 

"If it's new, it's at Sibley's" 
11 Court St. 



Join us at 



HOWARD JOHNSON'S 

Plymouth Shop 



(OPEN EVENINGS) 



MITCHELL-THOMAS CO., Inc. 



HOME FURNISHINGS 



66 Court Street 



Plymouth, Mass. 



THE PILGRIM 



Nook Farm Dairy 

Milk and Cream 



HEALTH 




BUILDER 



...LOCAL MILK... 

Taste the difference from a modem dairy 



TRY OUR FLAVORED DRINKS 
CHOCOLATE • ORANQE • COFFEE 

Nook Farm Dairy 



NOOK ROAD 



Tel. 1261 



PLYMOUTH 



THE PILGRIM 



89 



Compliments of 

DR. S. S. HIRSON 


EDYTHE'S BEAUTY SHOPPE 

16 Main St. PLYMOUTH 


MAYFLOWER CLEANERS 

KOBLANTZ BROS. 

First Class Tailoring 
Emond Bids. PLYMOUTH 


Compliments of 
EARL W. GOODING 

Jeweler and Optometrist 


VOLTA OIL COMPANY 

Distributor of 

Texaco Pelroleum Products 

NO. PLYMOUTH Tel. 840 


CONVENIENT, ECONOMICAL 
LAUNDRY SERVICE 

• 

(§lb (fttfUmjj iGamtinj 

Tel. 272 Howland St. 


Before You Buy Any Refrigerator 
Be sure you look at our 1940 Air Conditioned 

ICE REFRIGERATOR 

With Ice You Get All 5 Advantages 

ECONOMY — PROPER MOISTURE — CONSTANT COLD 

CLEANED-WASHED AIR — ICE CUBES 

• 
Remember — Cold alone is not enough 

• 

CAPE REFRIGERATING CO. 

PLANT AT nwflfwlJr^ SALES ° FFICE 
Hedges Road If/J^^ 44 Court St - 
Plymouth V Plymouth 



90 



THE PILGRIM 



BALBONI'S DRUG STORE 

"The Drug Store That Serves Plymouth" 
U. S. POSTAL STATION No. 2 

"PRESCRIPTIONS ACCURATELY FILLED — FREE DELIVERY" 

JOSEPH BALBONI, Registered Pharmacist 

Telephone 1231-1057 317 Court Street 

FOR NIGHT SERVICE CALL 432-W 



WALK-OVER SHOE STORE 

65 Main Street PLYMOUTH 

/Walk-Over Shoes 
\ Bass Moccasins 
Agents for (Kamp Tramps 

j Goodrich Line of 
I Sneakers and Rubbers 
Arnold & Stetson Shoes 

D. W. BESSE, Proprietor 



Compliments of 



EDES MANUFACTURING CO. 



STEVENS the Florist 

iFlmurrs for All GDrrammui 

Member of The Florist Telegraph Delivery Association 
9 COURT STREET 



A. CECCARELLI & SON 

Tailors 

SUITS MADE-TO-ORDER 

CLEANSERS FURRIERS 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



301 Court Street 
North Plymouth, Mass. 



Tel. 941 



WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER 



THE PILGRIM 



91 



DONOVAN & SULLIVAN 

ENGRAVING COMPANY 



PHOTO * ENGRAVERS 



470 Atlantic Avenue 
Harbor Building 



Boston, Mass. 
Lib. 8711 



Represented by 



P. V. CARTER, Pembroke, Mass. 



92 



THE PILGRIM 



Plymouth Co-operative Federal 

Savings and Loan Association 



Incorporated 1882 



Federalized 1937 



A. PERRY RICHARDS 
President 



ROBERT T. TUBBS 
Vice-Pres. and Treasurer 



W ALDER J. ENGSTROM 
Secretary and Asst. Treas. 



If youth 
but knew * 
what age 
would crave 




..they'd start 

TODAY and 
save and 

SAVE! 




* 



or more starts an account. 
Liberal earnings paid regularly 



INSURED 



Call or Write for Information 



Plymouth Co-operative 
Federal Savings 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Forfi/'four Main St., 
Plymouth, Massachusetts. 



THE PILGRIM 



93 



LEO'S 
BARBER AND BEAUTY SHOPS 

PLYMOUTH and DUXBURY 

Compliments of 
DR. A. L. DOUGLAS 



"We put New Life in Old Shoes" 
PLYMOUTH SHOE HOSPITAL 



6314 Main St. 



PLYMOUTH 



ZANELLO FURNITURE CO. 
UPHOLSTERING — BEDDING 

Repaired and Made to Order 
84 Court Street Tel. 1485 




PUZZLED 

by Qift 

Problems 2 
Take a Tip . . . Take a Trip to 



BURBANK'S, Inc. 



19-21 Court Street Plymouth, Mass. 

"THE NATION'S BIRTHPLACE" 






mm: 



•Sxsii 




f^^^ 

»« ^#^ 



"mm 

^ *>* — 



■mr 



94 



THE PILGRIM 



Plymouth Agents for . . . 

DUPONT'S PAINTS 

YOUNGSTOWN KITCHEN UNITS 

WESTINGHOUSE AIR CONDITIONING HOME HEATERS 

BLISS HARDWARE CO., Inc. 

Opposite Old Colony Theatre Tel. 825 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 


MIDDLE ST. GARAGE 

S. J. Zucchelli 


House x h Blue Blinds 

7 North St., Plymouth 
Tel. 1149 

Breakfast — Dinner — Supper 

Home-cooked Bread, Cake and Pastry 

JOHN and CONSTANCE KENNY 


Protects That Orange Juice Flavor 

DRINK 

ORANGE 
KIST 

MADE WITH REAL JUICE 

From Tree-Ripened Valencia Oranges 

Rich juice flavor — protected, sealed carbon- 
ation — assurance of freshness, sanitation 
and wholesomeness. 

Choose your favorite in Kist Beverages — 
Strawberry Kist, Lemon Kist, Lime Kist, 
Root Beer Kist, and many others. Ask your 
dealer — look for the Kist Sign on his store. 

Carbonated . . to protect the flavor 

Sealed . . to insure freshness 

PLYMOUTH BOTTLING WORKS 

Incorporated 

124 Sandwich Street Plymouth 
Tel. 1623-W 


This space dry cleaned by 

the Tailoring Dept. of the 

Puritan Clothing Co. 



THE PILGRIM 95 



Warren Kay Vantine Studio, Inc. 



C^af^-J 



Official Photographer 

for the 

Class of 1940 



C^f^^j 



160 Boylston Street Boston, Massachusetts 



9G 



THE PILGRIM 



QUaa* nf 1941T 



THE MEMORIAL PRESS 
PLYMOUTH, MASS.